Should a doping ban = a life sentence?

Description

After the winner of the men’s 100m sprint, Justin Gatlin, was booed at the London World Athletics Championships this month, I was asked by Canberra’s 2CCradio Breakfast Show host, Tim Shaw: ‘Should sports doping cheats be banned for life?’. Gatlin has served two doping bans, but denies ever having cheated. Clearly there was some doubt about the veracity of that denial in the minds of the spectators, and many of the commentators, but their response also serves to demonstrate the challenges caused by what McDermott (2016) calls the anti-doping ‘moral panicleading to the vilification of athletes for the remainder of their lives. 

Period31 Aug 2017

Media contributions

1

Media contributions

  • TitleShould a doping ban = a life sentence?
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletThe Sports Integrity Initiative
    Media typePrint
    Duration/Length/Size2 Pages
    CountryAustralia
    Date31/08/17
    DescriptionAfter the winner of the men’s 100m sprint, Justin Gatlin, was booed at the London World Athletics Championships this month, I was asked by Canberra’s 2CC radio Breakfast Show host, Tim Shaw: ‘Should sports doping cheats be banned for life?’. Gatlin has served two doping bans, but denies ever having cheated. Clearly there was some doubt about the veracity of that denial in the minds of the spectators, and many of the commentators, but their response also serves to demonstrate the challenges caused by what McDermott (2016) calls the anti-doping ‘moral panic’ leading to the vilification of athletes for the remainder of their lives.
    Producer/AuthorCatherine Ordway
    PersonsCatherine Ordway