Description

Most people consuming information online in Australia take no steps to verify its accuracy. 

Given Australia has just been through a federal election cycle where the proliferation of misinformation was part of the voter experience, new research about digital media trends makes for interesting, if sobering, reading.

According to work from the University of Canberra in cooperation with the Reuters Institute and the University of Oxford, a majority of online consumers in Australia, 62%, are concerned about what is real and what is fake on the internet.

This level of local concern is higher than the global average and, the more interested in politics you are, the more you worry about fake news.

Period12 Jun 2019

Media coverage

1

Media coverage

  • TitleTruth decay: why personal values are poisoning Australians’ news consumption
    Degree of recognitionNational
    Media name/outletThe Guardian Australia
    Media typeWeb
    Duration/Length/Size600 words
    CountryAustralia
    Date12/06/19
    DescriptionMost people consuming information online in Australia take no steps to verify its accuracy.
    Given Australia has just been through a federal election cycle where the proliferation of misinformation was part of the voter experience, new research about digital media trends makes for interesting, if sobering, reading.

    According to work from the University of Canberra in cooperation with the Reuters Institute and the University of Oxford, a majority of online consumers in Australia, 62%, are concerned about what is real and what is fake on the internet.

    This level of local concern is higher than the global average and, the more interested in politics you are, the more you worry about fake news.
    Producer/AuthorKatharine Murphy
    PersonsCaroline Fisher, Sora Park, Glen Fuller, Yoonmo Sang, Jee Young LEE