2015 Special Issue

The Natural Resource Sector, Partnerships and Indigenous Entrepreneurship: Theory, Policy and Practice

Bob Kayseas, Dennis FOLEY, Wanda Wuttunee

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

Indigenous communities are being impacted by the development of natural resources in a variety of ways. Some communities have chosen to pursue economic opportunities by forming alliances with governments and industry partners and/or through the formation of new ventures. Other communities choose to ‘opt out’ of natural resource development projects for reasons usually related to environmental impact concerns (Anderson 1997; Anderson et al. 2006). For this special issue we seek theoretical and empirical work that advances our understanding of the multiple ways in which strategic alliances and partnerships between natural resource corporations, governments and Indigenous communities can be negotiated, formed, sustained and leveraged for the purposes of creating win/win value propositions that may have either a direct or indirect impact on the creation of wholly owned or joint new ventures.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)113-115
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Natural resources
Indigenous entrepreneurship
New ventures
Indigenous communities
Government
Win-win
Value proposition
Industry
Alliances
Development projects
Environmental impact
Strategic alliances
Strategic partnership
Economics

Cite this

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2015 Special Issue : The Natural Resource Sector, Partnerships and Indigenous Entrepreneurship: Theory, Policy and Practice. / Kayseas, Bob; FOLEY, Dennis; Wuttunee, Wanda.

In: Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, Vol. 27, No. 1, 2015, p. 113-115.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

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