A Clinical Trial of an Operant Treatment for School-Age Children Who Stutter

Michelle Lincoln, Mark Onslow, Christine Lewis, Linda Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effectiveness of a nonprogrammed, operant treatment for school-age children who stutter. The treatment was administered by clinicians and parents to 11 children between the ages of 7 and 12 years. A median of 12 one-hour treatment sessions was required to achieve less than 1.5% syllables stuttered during within-clinic and beyond-clinic speaking situations. The children's speech was assessed in three everyday speaking situations over a 12-month post-treatment period. All children maintained decreased stuttering rates at 12 months post-treatment. In addition, surveys found that parents were "satisfied" or "very satisfied" with their children's speech post-treatment. These results suggest that a nonprogrammed operant treatment for stuttering may be effective with school-age children who stutter.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)73-85
Number of pages13
JournalAmerican Journal of Speech-Language Pathology
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Clinical Trials
school
Stuttering
speaking
parents
Therapeutics
Parents

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Lincoln, Michelle ; Onslow, Mark ; Lewis, Christine ; Wilson, Linda. / A Clinical Trial of an Operant Treatment for School-Age Children Who Stutter. In: American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. 1996 ; Vol. 5, No. 2. pp. 73-85.
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A Clinical Trial of an Operant Treatment for School-Age Children Who Stutter. / Lincoln, Michelle; Onslow, Mark; Lewis, Christine; Wilson, Linda.

In: American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Vol. 5, No. 2, 01.01.1996, p. 73-85.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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