A comparative study of life-years lost attributable to air particulate matter in Asia-Pacific and European countries

Pattheera Somboonsin, Sotiris Vardoulakis, Vladimir Canudas-Romo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Air particulate matter (PM) and its harmful effects on human health are of great concern globally due to all-cause and cause-specific mortality impacts across different population groups. While Europe has made significant progress in reducing particulate air pollution-related mortality through innovative technologies and policies, many countries in Asia-Pacific region still rely on high-polluting technologies and have yet to implement effective policies to address this issue, resulting in higher levels of mortality due to air pollution in the region. This study has three aims related to quantifying life-years lost (LYL) attributable to PM, and further separated into ambient PM and household air pollution (HAP): (1) to investigate LYL by causes of death; (2) to compare LYL between Asia-Pacific (APAC) and Europe; and (3) to assess LYL across different socio-demographic index (SDI) countries. The data used come from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) and Health Effects Institute (HEI). Our results show that average LYL due to PM in APAC was greater than in Europe, with some Pacific island countries particularly affected by the exposure to HAP. Three quarters of LYL came from premature deaths by ischemic heart disease and stroke, in both continents. There were significant differences between SDI groups for causes of death due to ambient PM and HAP. Our findings call for urgent improvement of clean air to reduce indoor and outdoor air pollution-related mortality in the APAC region.

Original languageEnglish
Article number139420
Pages (from-to)1-11
Number of pages11
JournalChemosphere
Volume338
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2023
Externally publishedYes

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