A comparison of different modes of morning priming exercise on afternoon performance

Mark Russell, Aden King, Richard M Bracken, Christian J Cook, Thibault Giroud, Liam P Kilduff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: To assess the effects of different modes of morning (AM) exercise on afternoon (PM) performance and salivary hormone responses in professional rugby union players.

METHODS: On 4 occasions (randomized, crossover design), 15 professional rugby players provided AM (~8 AM) and PM (~2 PM) saliva samples before PM assessments of countermovement-jump height, reaction time, and repeated-sprint ability. Control (passive rest), weights (bench press: 5 × 10 repetitions, 75% 1-repetition maximum, 90-s intraset recovery), cycling (6 × 6-s maximal sprint cycling, 7.5% body mass load, 54-s intraset recovery), and running (6 × 40-m maximal sprints, 20-s intraset recovery) interventions preceded (~5 h) PM testing.

RESULTS: PM sprint performance improved (P < .05) after weights (>0.15 ± 0.19 s, >2.04% ± 2.46%) and running (>0.15 ± 0.17 s, >2.12% ± 2.22%) but not cycling (P > .05). PM jump height increased after cycling (0.012 ± 0.009 m, 2.31% ± 1.76%, P < .001) and running (0.020 ± 0.009 m, 3.90% ± 1.79%, P < .001) but not weights (P = .936). Reaction time remained unchanged between trials (P = .379). Relative to control (131 ± 21 pg/mL), PM testosterone was greater in weights (21 ± 23 pg/mL, 17% ± 18%, P = .002) and running (28 ± 26 pg/mL, 22% ± 20%, P = .001) but not cycling (P = .072). Salivary cortisol was unaffected by AM exercise (P = .540).

CONCLUSIONS: All modes of AM exercise improved at least 1 marker of PM performance, but running appeared the most beneficial to professional rugby union players. A rationale therefore exists for preceding PM competition with AM exercise.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)763-767
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
Volume11
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Running
Football
Weights and Measures
Reaction Time
Aptitude
Saliva
Cross-Over Studies
Hydrocortisone
Testosterone
Hormones

Cite this

Russell, Mark ; King, Aden ; Bracken, Richard M ; Cook, Christian J ; Giroud, Thibault ; Kilduff, Liam P. / A comparison of different modes of morning priming exercise on afternoon performance. In: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance. 2016 ; Vol. 11, No. 6. pp. 763-767.
@article{31b1900b6f564f17a47a9ccf6b1435d5,
title = "A comparison of different modes of morning priming exercise on afternoon performance",
abstract = "PURPOSE: To assess the effects of different modes of morning (AM) exercise on afternoon (PM) performance and salivary hormone responses in professional rugby union players.METHODS: On 4 occasions (randomized, crossover design), 15 professional rugby players provided AM (~8 AM) and PM (~2 PM) saliva samples before PM assessments of countermovement-jump height, reaction time, and repeated-sprint ability. Control (passive rest), weights (bench press: 5 × 10 repetitions, 75{\%} 1-repetition maximum, 90-s intraset recovery), cycling (6 × 6-s maximal sprint cycling, 7.5{\%} body mass load, 54-s intraset recovery), and running (6 × 40-m maximal sprints, 20-s intraset recovery) interventions preceded (~5 h) PM testing.RESULTS: PM sprint performance improved (P < .05) after weights (>0.15 ± 0.19 s, >2.04{\%} ± 2.46{\%}) and running (>0.15 ± 0.17 s, >2.12{\%} ± 2.22{\%}) but not cycling (P > .05). PM jump height increased after cycling (0.012 ± 0.009 m, 2.31{\%} ± 1.76{\%}, P < .001) and running (0.020 ± 0.009 m, 3.90{\%} ± 1.79{\%}, P < .001) but not weights (P = .936). Reaction time remained unchanged between trials (P = .379). Relative to control (131 ± 21 pg/mL), PM testosterone was greater in weights (21 ± 23 pg/mL, 17{\%} ± 18{\%}, P = .002) and running (28 ± 26 pg/mL, 22{\%} ± 20{\%}, P = .001) but not cycling (P = .072). Salivary cortisol was unaffected by AM exercise (P = .540).CONCLUSIONS: All modes of AM exercise improved at least 1 marker of PM performance, but running appeared the most beneficial to professional rugby union players. A rationale therefore exists for preceding PM competition with AM exercise.",
keywords = "Ergogenic, Hormone, Potentiation, Rugby",
author = "Mark Russell and Aden King and Bracken, {Richard M} and Cook, {Christian J} and Thibault Giroud and Kilduff, {Liam P}",
note = "Export Date: 25 May 2017",
year = "2016",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1123/ijspp.2015-0508",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "763--767",
journal = "International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance",
issn = "1555-0265",
publisher = "Human Kinetics Publishers Inc.",
number = "6",

}

A comparison of different modes of morning priming exercise on afternoon performance. / Russell, Mark; King, Aden; Bracken, Richard M; Cook, Christian J; Giroud, Thibault; Kilduff, Liam P.

In: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, Vol. 11, No. 6, 09.2016, p. 763-767.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - A comparison of different modes of morning priming exercise on afternoon performance

AU - Russell, Mark

AU - King, Aden

AU - Bracken, Richard M

AU - Cook, Christian J

AU - Giroud, Thibault

AU - Kilduff, Liam P

N1 - Export Date: 25 May 2017

PY - 2016/9

Y1 - 2016/9

N2 - PURPOSE: To assess the effects of different modes of morning (AM) exercise on afternoon (PM) performance and salivary hormone responses in professional rugby union players.METHODS: On 4 occasions (randomized, crossover design), 15 professional rugby players provided AM (~8 AM) and PM (~2 PM) saliva samples before PM assessments of countermovement-jump height, reaction time, and repeated-sprint ability. Control (passive rest), weights (bench press: 5 × 10 repetitions, 75% 1-repetition maximum, 90-s intraset recovery), cycling (6 × 6-s maximal sprint cycling, 7.5% body mass load, 54-s intraset recovery), and running (6 × 40-m maximal sprints, 20-s intraset recovery) interventions preceded (~5 h) PM testing.RESULTS: PM sprint performance improved (P < .05) after weights (>0.15 ± 0.19 s, >2.04% ± 2.46%) and running (>0.15 ± 0.17 s, >2.12% ± 2.22%) but not cycling (P > .05). PM jump height increased after cycling (0.012 ± 0.009 m, 2.31% ± 1.76%, P < .001) and running (0.020 ± 0.009 m, 3.90% ± 1.79%, P < .001) but not weights (P = .936). Reaction time remained unchanged between trials (P = .379). Relative to control (131 ± 21 pg/mL), PM testosterone was greater in weights (21 ± 23 pg/mL, 17% ± 18%, P = .002) and running (28 ± 26 pg/mL, 22% ± 20%, P = .001) but not cycling (P = .072). Salivary cortisol was unaffected by AM exercise (P = .540).CONCLUSIONS: All modes of AM exercise improved at least 1 marker of PM performance, but running appeared the most beneficial to professional rugby union players. A rationale therefore exists for preceding PM competition with AM exercise.

AB - PURPOSE: To assess the effects of different modes of morning (AM) exercise on afternoon (PM) performance and salivary hormone responses in professional rugby union players.METHODS: On 4 occasions (randomized, crossover design), 15 professional rugby players provided AM (~8 AM) and PM (~2 PM) saliva samples before PM assessments of countermovement-jump height, reaction time, and repeated-sprint ability. Control (passive rest), weights (bench press: 5 × 10 repetitions, 75% 1-repetition maximum, 90-s intraset recovery), cycling (6 × 6-s maximal sprint cycling, 7.5% body mass load, 54-s intraset recovery), and running (6 × 40-m maximal sprints, 20-s intraset recovery) interventions preceded (~5 h) PM testing.RESULTS: PM sprint performance improved (P < .05) after weights (>0.15 ± 0.19 s, >2.04% ± 2.46%) and running (>0.15 ± 0.17 s, >2.12% ± 2.22%) but not cycling (P > .05). PM jump height increased after cycling (0.012 ± 0.009 m, 2.31% ± 1.76%, P < .001) and running (0.020 ± 0.009 m, 3.90% ± 1.79%, P < .001) but not weights (P = .936). Reaction time remained unchanged between trials (P = .379). Relative to control (131 ± 21 pg/mL), PM testosterone was greater in weights (21 ± 23 pg/mL, 17% ± 18%, P = .002) and running (28 ± 26 pg/mL, 22% ± 20%, P = .001) but not cycling (P = .072). Salivary cortisol was unaffected by AM exercise (P = .540).CONCLUSIONS: All modes of AM exercise improved at least 1 marker of PM performance, but running appeared the most beneficial to professional rugby union players. A rationale therefore exists for preceding PM competition with AM exercise.

KW - Ergogenic

KW - Hormone

KW - Potentiation

KW - Rugby

U2 - 10.1123/ijspp.2015-0508

DO - 10.1123/ijspp.2015-0508

M3 - Article

VL - 11

SP - 763

EP - 767

JO - International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance

JF - International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance

SN - 1555-0265

IS - 6

ER -