A comparison of the psychological demands of well trained cyclists to field and laboratory mountain bike stimulation

E Lawton

Research output: Contribution to conference (non-published works)Abstract

Abstract

Limited previous research has been undertaken on the physiological demands of mountain bike (MTB) racing. Five male well-trained MTB cross-country cyclists (VO2r, ax 72.0+4.6 ml kg- ~min-~, maximum power output (MPO) 5.4+0.3 W kg -~, maximum heart rate (HRmax) 188.6+6.5 bpm) performed two laps of a MTB course in the field with SRM power cranks fitted. A computer laboratory race simulation using a Hayes windbraked ergometer required subjects to match the average power output (W kg -1) and reach the peak power output once every 5 s period. Power output and heart rate were measured during field and laboratory trials, while oxygen uptake (VO2) was determined during the laboratory simulation. No difference was observed in the mean power output and heart rate between the field and laboratory trials (4.18+0.55 vs. 4.22+0.19 W kg -1, 175.4+8.7 vs. 170.0+8.1 bpm) respectively. During field and
laboratory trials subjects utilised 77.4 vs. 78.1% of MPO, 93.0 vs. 90.1% of HR~,~x respectively. Mean and peak VO2 for the simulation were 57.5+3.3 and 69.3+4.4 ml kg -1 min 4 respectively, with subjects working at -80%. In summary, power output and heart rate can be replicated in a laboratory simulation of MTB racing.
Original languageEnglish
Pages1
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes
Event2002 Australian Conference of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sports Medicine and Science at the Extremes - Melbourne, Australia
Duration: 11 Oct 200215 Oct 2002

Conference

Conference2002 Australian Conference of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sports Medicine and Science at the Extremes
CountryAustralia
CityMelbourne
Period11/10/0215/10/02

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A comparison of the psychological demands of well trained cyclists to field and laboratory mountain bike stimulation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Lawton, E. (2002). A comparison of the psychological demands of well trained cyclists to field and laboratory mountain bike stimulation. 1. Abstract from 2002 Australian Conference of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sports Medicine and Science at the Extremes, Melbourne, Australia.