A complex relationship exists between gluteal tendon reconstruction outcomes, pain and comorbidities

Angela Fearon, Sally Gilbert, Wayne Spratford, Tom Sizeland, Joe Lynch, Paul Smith, Diana Perriman

Research output: Contribution to conference (non-published works)Abstract

Abstract

Aim: To determine if gluteal tendon reconstructive (GTR) surgery provides patients with equivalent functional ability as a healthy age and sex matched group. Design: Cohort comparison trial. Methods: Thirty-six GTR patients were recruited from a single surgeon. Exclusion criteria was surgery < 12 months ago or a recent pelvic or lower limb fracture. Thirty age and sex matched comparison group participants were recruited. Exclusion criteria for this group included pain levels of >3/10 in the lower limb or back or a history of lower limb or back surgery. Primary outcome measures were VISA-G, modified Harris Hip Score, Intermittent and Constant Osteoarthritis Pain score, Assessment of Quality of Life, 6-minute walk test, gait speed, stair ascend/descend, 30s sit to stand, and Timed Up and Go. Covariate measures were Body Mass Index, comorbidities, pain (visual analogue scale), and abduction strength. Results: People who had a gluteal tendon reconstruction had poorer quality of life (-0.112; p < 0.000), walked a shorter distance (6MWT -10.5; p < 0.000), had slower gait speed (-0.23; p = 0.001), Timed Up and Go (2.2; p = 0.001) and fewer sit to stands (5.0; p = 0.000). The number of comorbidities a participant had, had a clinically important impact on Quality of Life (-0.04; p ≤ 0.001) and 6MWT (-38.48; p ≤ 0.001). Pain negatively affected Quality of Life (-0.04; p ≤ 0.001). Conclusion: A complex relationship exists between GTR outcomes and comorbidities.
Original languageEnglish
Pages92-92
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2019
EventTransform 2019: Physiotherapy Conference - Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia
Duration: 17 Oct 201919 Oct 2019

Conference

ConferenceTransform 2019
CountryAustralia
CityAdelaide
Period17/10/1919/10/19

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Tendons
Comorbidity
Quality of Life
Pain
Lower Extremity
Pain Measurement
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures
Research Design
Aptitude
Osteoarthritis
Hip
Body Mass Index
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Walking Speed

Cite this

Fearon, A., Gilbert, S., Spratford, W., Sizeland, T., Lynch, J., Smith, P., & Perriman, D. (2019). A complex relationship exists between gluteal tendon reconstruction outcomes, pain and comorbidities. 92-92. Abstract from Transform 2019, Adelaide, Australia.
Fearon, Angela ; Gilbert, Sally ; Spratford, Wayne ; Sizeland, Tom ; Lynch, Joe ; Smith, Paul ; Perriman, Diana. / A complex relationship exists between gluteal tendon reconstruction outcomes, pain and comorbidities. Abstract from Transform 2019, Adelaide, Australia.1 p.
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abstract = "Aim: To determine if gluteal tendon reconstructive (GTR) surgery provides patients with equivalent functional ability as a healthy age and sex matched group. Design: Cohort comparison trial. Methods: Thirty-six GTR patients were recruited from a single surgeon. Exclusion criteria was surgery < 12 months ago or a recent pelvic or lower limb fracture. Thirty age and sex matched comparison group participants were recruited. Exclusion criteria for this group included pain levels of >3/10 in the lower limb or back or a history of lower limb or back surgery. Primary outcome measures were VISA-G, modified Harris Hip Score, Intermittent and Constant Osteoarthritis Pain score, Assessment of Quality of Life, 6-minute walk test, gait speed, stair ascend/descend, 30s sit to stand, and Timed Up and Go. Covariate measures were Body Mass Index, comorbidities, pain (visual analogue scale), and abduction strength. Results: People who had a gluteal tendon reconstruction had poorer quality of life (-0.112; p < 0.000), walked a shorter distance (6MWT -10.5; p < 0.000), had slower gait speed (-0.23; p = 0.001), Timed Up and Go (2.2; p = 0.001) and fewer sit to stands (5.0; p = 0.000). The number of comorbidities a participant had, had a clinically important impact on Quality of Life (-0.04; p ≤ 0.001) and 6MWT (-38.48; p ≤ 0.001). Pain negatively affected Quality of Life (-0.04; p ≤ 0.001). Conclusion: A complex relationship exists between GTR outcomes and comorbidities.",
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Fearon, A, Gilbert, S, Spratford, W, Sizeland, T, Lynch, J, Smith, P & Perriman, D 2019, 'A complex relationship exists between gluteal tendon reconstruction outcomes, pain and comorbidities' Transform 2019, Adelaide, Australia, 17/10/19 - 19/10/19, pp. 92-92.

A complex relationship exists between gluteal tendon reconstruction outcomes, pain and comorbidities. / Fearon, Angela; Gilbert, Sally; Spratford, Wayne; Sizeland, Tom; Lynch, Joe; Smith, Paul; Perriman, Diana.

2019. 92-92 Abstract from Transform 2019, Adelaide, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conference (non-published works)Abstract

TY - CONF

T1 - A complex relationship exists between gluteal tendon reconstruction outcomes, pain and comorbidities

AU - Fearon, Angela

AU - Gilbert, Sally

AU - Spratford, Wayne

AU - Sizeland, Tom

AU - Lynch, Joe

AU - Smith, Paul

AU - Perriman, Diana

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Aim: To determine if gluteal tendon reconstructive (GTR) surgery provides patients with equivalent functional ability as a healthy age and sex matched group. Design: Cohort comparison trial. Methods: Thirty-six GTR patients were recruited from a single surgeon. Exclusion criteria was surgery < 12 months ago or a recent pelvic or lower limb fracture. Thirty age and sex matched comparison group participants were recruited. Exclusion criteria for this group included pain levels of >3/10 in the lower limb or back or a history of lower limb or back surgery. Primary outcome measures were VISA-G, modified Harris Hip Score, Intermittent and Constant Osteoarthritis Pain score, Assessment of Quality of Life, 6-minute walk test, gait speed, stair ascend/descend, 30s sit to stand, and Timed Up and Go. Covariate measures were Body Mass Index, comorbidities, pain (visual analogue scale), and abduction strength. Results: People who had a gluteal tendon reconstruction had poorer quality of life (-0.112; p < 0.000), walked a shorter distance (6MWT -10.5; p < 0.000), had slower gait speed (-0.23; p = 0.001), Timed Up and Go (2.2; p = 0.001) and fewer sit to stands (5.0; p = 0.000). The number of comorbidities a participant had, had a clinically important impact on Quality of Life (-0.04; p ≤ 0.001) and 6MWT (-38.48; p ≤ 0.001). Pain negatively affected Quality of Life (-0.04; p ≤ 0.001). Conclusion: A complex relationship exists between GTR outcomes and comorbidities.

AB - Aim: To determine if gluteal tendon reconstructive (GTR) surgery provides patients with equivalent functional ability as a healthy age and sex matched group. Design: Cohort comparison trial. Methods: Thirty-six GTR patients were recruited from a single surgeon. Exclusion criteria was surgery < 12 months ago or a recent pelvic or lower limb fracture. Thirty age and sex matched comparison group participants were recruited. Exclusion criteria for this group included pain levels of >3/10 in the lower limb or back or a history of lower limb or back surgery. Primary outcome measures were VISA-G, modified Harris Hip Score, Intermittent and Constant Osteoarthritis Pain score, Assessment of Quality of Life, 6-minute walk test, gait speed, stair ascend/descend, 30s sit to stand, and Timed Up and Go. Covariate measures were Body Mass Index, comorbidities, pain (visual analogue scale), and abduction strength. Results: People who had a gluteal tendon reconstruction had poorer quality of life (-0.112; p < 0.000), walked a shorter distance (6MWT -10.5; p < 0.000), had slower gait speed (-0.23; p = 0.001), Timed Up and Go (2.2; p = 0.001) and fewer sit to stands (5.0; p = 0.000). The number of comorbidities a participant had, had a clinically important impact on Quality of Life (-0.04; p ≤ 0.001) and 6MWT (-38.48; p ≤ 0.001). Pain negatively affected Quality of Life (-0.04; p ≤ 0.001). Conclusion: A complex relationship exists between GTR outcomes and comorbidities.

UR - https://transform.physio/

M3 - Abstract

SP - 92

EP - 92

ER -

Fearon A, Gilbert S, Spratford W, Sizeland T, Lynch J, Smith P et al. A complex relationship exists between gluteal tendon reconstruction outcomes, pain and comorbidities. 2019. Abstract from Transform 2019, Adelaide, Australia.