A Consensus Model: Shifting assessment practices in dietetics tertiary education.

Rachel BACON, Jane KELLETT, Janeane Dart, Cathy KNIGHT-AGARWAL, Rebecca METE, Susan Ash, Claire Palermo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Title: A Consensus Model: Shifting assessment practices in dietetics tertiary education.

Abstract
Aim: The aim of this research was to evaluate a Consensus Model for competency-based assessment.
Methods: An evaluative case study was used to allow a holistic examination of a constructivist-interpretivist programmatic model of assessment. Using a modified-Delphi process, the competence of all 29 students enrolled in their final year of a Master of Nutrition and Dietetics course was assessed by a panel (with expertise in competency-based assessment; industry and academic representation) from a course e-portfolio (that included the judgements of student performance made by worksite educators) and a panel interview. Data was triangulated with assessments from a capstone internship. Qualitative descriptive studies with worksite educators (focus groups n=4, n=5, n=8) and students (personal interviews n=29) explored stakeholder experiences analysed using thematic analysis.
Results: Panel consensus was achieved for all cases by the third-round and corroborated by internship outcomes. For 34% of students this differed to the ‘interpretations’ of their performance made by their worksite educator/s. Emerging qualitative themes from stakeholder data found the model: (1) Supported sustainable assessment practices; (2) Shifted the power relationship between students and worksite educators; and (3) Provided a fair method to assess competence. To maximise benefits, more refinement, resources and training are required.
Conclusions: This research questions competency-based assessment practices based on discrete placement units and supports a constructivist-interpretivist programmatic approach where evidence across a whole course of study is considered by a panel of assessors.
LanguageEnglish
Article numberEarly View: (DOI) - 10.1111/1747-0080.12415
Pages1-13
Number of pages13
JournalNutrition and Dietetics
Early online date2018
StatePublished - 2018

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Dietetics
Consensus
Workplace
Students
Education
Internship and Residency
Mental Competency
Interviews
Focus Groups
Research
Industry

Cite this

BACON, R., KELLETT, J., Dart, J., KNIGHT-AGARWAL, C., METE, R., Ash, S., & Palermo, C. (2018). A Consensus Model: Shifting assessment practices in dietetics tertiary education. Nutrition and Dietetics, 1-13. [Early View: (DOI) - 10.1111/1747-0080.12415].
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A Consensus Model: Shifting assessment practices in dietetics tertiary education. / BACON, Rachel; KELLETT, Jane; Dart, Janeane; KNIGHT-AGARWAL, Cathy; METE, Rebecca; Ash, Susan; Palermo, Claire.

In: Nutrition and Dietetics, 2018, p. 1-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - BACON,Rachel

AU - KELLETT,Jane

AU - Dart,Janeane

AU - KNIGHT-AGARWAL,Cathy

AU - METE,Rebecca

AU - Ash,Susan

AU - Palermo,Claire

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N2 - Title: A Consensus Model: Shifting assessment practices in dietetics tertiary education.AbstractAim: The aim of this research was to evaluate a Consensus Model for competency-based assessment. Methods: An evaluative case study was used to allow a holistic examination of a constructivist-interpretivist programmatic model of assessment. Using a modified-Delphi process, the competence of all 29 students enrolled in their final year of a Master of Nutrition and Dietetics course was assessed by a panel (with expertise in competency-based assessment; industry and academic representation) from a course e-portfolio (that included the judgements of student performance made by worksite educators) and a panel interview. Data was triangulated with assessments from a capstone internship. Qualitative descriptive studies with worksite educators (focus groups n=4, n=5, n=8) and students (personal interviews n=29) explored stakeholder experiences analysed using thematic analysis. Results: Panel consensus was achieved for all cases by the third-round and corroborated by internship outcomes. For 34% of students this differed to the ‘interpretations’ of their performance made by their worksite educator/s. Emerging qualitative themes from stakeholder data found the model: (1) Supported sustainable assessment practices; (2) Shifted the power relationship between students and worksite educators; and (3) Provided a fair method to assess competence. To maximise benefits, more refinement, resources and training are required.Conclusions: This research questions competency-based assessment practices based on discrete placement units and supports a constructivist-interpretivist programmatic approach where evidence across a whole course of study is considered by a panel of assessors.

AB - Title: A Consensus Model: Shifting assessment practices in dietetics tertiary education.AbstractAim: The aim of this research was to evaluate a Consensus Model for competency-based assessment. Methods: An evaluative case study was used to allow a holistic examination of a constructivist-interpretivist programmatic model of assessment. Using a modified-Delphi process, the competence of all 29 students enrolled in their final year of a Master of Nutrition and Dietetics course was assessed by a panel (with expertise in competency-based assessment; industry and academic representation) from a course e-portfolio (that included the judgements of student performance made by worksite educators) and a panel interview. Data was triangulated with assessments from a capstone internship. Qualitative descriptive studies with worksite educators (focus groups n=4, n=5, n=8) and students (personal interviews n=29) explored stakeholder experiences analysed using thematic analysis. Results: Panel consensus was achieved for all cases by the third-round and corroborated by internship outcomes. For 34% of students this differed to the ‘interpretations’ of their performance made by their worksite educator/s. Emerging qualitative themes from stakeholder data found the model: (1) Supported sustainable assessment practices; (2) Shifted the power relationship between students and worksite educators; and (3) Provided a fair method to assess competence. To maximise benefits, more refinement, resources and training are required.Conclusions: This research questions competency-based assessment practices based on discrete placement units and supports a constructivist-interpretivist programmatic approach where evidence across a whole course of study is considered by a panel of assessors.

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