A Fresh Look at Municipal Consolidation in Australia

Chris AULICH, Graham Sansom, Peter McKinlay

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    18 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This article draws from a major research project examining the impact of various forms of municipal consolidation in Australia and New Zealand. Its wide-ranging research involved studies of 15 cases of different forms of consolidation, including amalgamation, together with a series of interviews with senior practitioners from the local government sector. Data revealed little evidence of consistent economies of scale from consolidation, however both case studies and interviews indicated that consolidation generated economies of scope and what may be termed 'strategic capacity'. While it was not possible to disaggregate the data for particular sizes of local authority, enhancement of strategic capacity was more obvious through processes of consolidation in larger ones and less so in smaller, more remote ones. © 2014 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1-20
    Number of pages20
    JournalLocal Government Studies
    Volume40
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014

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    consolidation
    economy
    economy of scale
    interview
    local government
    New Zealand
    research project
    evidence

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    AULICH, Chris ; Sansom, Graham ; McKinlay, Peter. / A Fresh Look at Municipal Consolidation in Australia. In: Local Government Studies. 2014 ; Vol. 40, No. 1. pp. 1-20.
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    A Fresh Look at Municipal Consolidation in Australia. / AULICH, Chris; Sansom, Graham; McKinlay, Peter.

    In: Local Government Studies, Vol. 40, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 1-20.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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