A law enforcement intelligence framework for use in predictive DNA phenotyping

Nathan SCUDDER, James ROBERTSON, Sally KELTY, Simon WALSH, Dennis McNevin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Analysis of information about physical characteristics, biogeographical ancestry or common genetic ancestors from crime scene DNA is a technique aimed at informing an intelligence process, rather than obtaining evidence for a criminal trial. This intelligence supports tactical or operational decision-making. Like other forms of intelligence there is a risk for it to be misconstrued or for its investigative value to be misunderstood. The potential for intelligence derived from DNA to divert investigative resources or result in unnecessary intrusions into individual privacy can be mitigated by applying an appropriate intelligence doctrine. Establishing an appropriate framework could reduce the need for government regulation of these emerging capabilities in the context of law enforcement use.

LanguageEnglish
Pages1-4
Number of pages4
JournalAustralian Journal of Forensic Sciences
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 29 Jan 2019

Fingerprint

Law Enforcement
Intelligence
DNA
Government Regulation
Privacy
Crime
Decision Making

Cite this

@article{490f8500e1404fc79a222d471b97ccf7,
title = "A law enforcement intelligence framework for use in predictive DNA phenotyping",
abstract = "Analysis of information about physical characteristics, biogeographical ancestry or common genetic ancestors from crime scene DNA is a technique aimed at informing an intelligence process, rather than obtaining evidence for a criminal trial. This intelligence supports tactical or operational decision-making. Like other forms of intelligence there is a risk for it to be misconstrued or for its investigative value to be misunderstood. The potential for intelligence derived from DNA to divert investigative resources or result in unnecessary intrusions into individual privacy can be mitigated by applying an appropriate intelligence doctrine. Establishing an appropriate framework could reduce the need for government regulation of these emerging capabilities in the context of law enforcement use.",
keywords = "forensic DNA phenotyping, forensic intelligence, intelligence doctrine, forensic genetic genealogy, Forensic DNA phenotyping",
author = "Nathan SCUDDER and James ROBERTSON and Sally KELTY and Simon WALSH and Dennis McNevin",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "29",
doi = "10.1080/00450618.2019.1569132",
language = "English",
pages = "1--4",
journal = "Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences",
issn = "0045-0618",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",

}

A law enforcement intelligence framework for use in predictive DNA phenotyping. / SCUDDER, Nathan; ROBERTSON, James; KELTY, Sally; WALSH, Simon; McNevin, Dennis.

In: Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences, 29.01.2019, p. 1-4.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - A law enforcement intelligence framework for use in predictive DNA phenotyping

AU - SCUDDER, Nathan

AU - ROBERTSON, James

AU - KELTY, Sally

AU - WALSH, Simon

AU - McNevin, Dennis

PY - 2019/1/29

Y1 - 2019/1/29

N2 - Analysis of information about physical characteristics, biogeographical ancestry or common genetic ancestors from crime scene DNA is a technique aimed at informing an intelligence process, rather than obtaining evidence for a criminal trial. This intelligence supports tactical or operational decision-making. Like other forms of intelligence there is a risk for it to be misconstrued or for its investigative value to be misunderstood. The potential for intelligence derived from DNA to divert investigative resources or result in unnecessary intrusions into individual privacy can be mitigated by applying an appropriate intelligence doctrine. Establishing an appropriate framework could reduce the need for government regulation of these emerging capabilities in the context of law enforcement use.

AB - Analysis of information about physical characteristics, biogeographical ancestry or common genetic ancestors from crime scene DNA is a technique aimed at informing an intelligence process, rather than obtaining evidence for a criminal trial. This intelligence supports tactical or operational decision-making. Like other forms of intelligence there is a risk for it to be misconstrued or for its investigative value to be misunderstood. The potential for intelligence derived from DNA to divert investigative resources or result in unnecessary intrusions into individual privacy can be mitigated by applying an appropriate intelligence doctrine. Establishing an appropriate framework could reduce the need for government regulation of these emerging capabilities in the context of law enforcement use.

KW - forensic DNA phenotyping

KW - forensic intelligence

KW - intelligence doctrine

KW - forensic genetic genealogy

KW - Forensic DNA phenotyping

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85060955238&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/00450618.2019.1569132

DO - 10.1080/00450618.2019.1569132

M3 - Article

SP - 1

EP - 4

JO - Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences

T2 - Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences

JF - Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences

SN - 0045-0618

ER -