A monetary reward alters pacing but not performance in competitive cyclists

Sabrina Skorski, Kevin G. Thompson, Richard J. Keegan, Tim Meyer, Chris R. Abbiss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)
2 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Money has frequently been used as an extrinsic motivator since it is assumed that humans are willing to invest more effort for financial reward. However, the influence of a monetary reward on pacing and performance in trained athletes is not well-understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyse the influence of a monetary reward in well-trained cyclists on their pacing and performance during short and long cycling time trials (TT). Twentythree cyclists (6 ♀, 17 ♂) completed 4 self-paced time trials (TTs, 2 short: 4 km and 6 min; 2 long: 20 km and 30 min); in a randomized order. Participants were separated into parallel, non-randomized "rewarded" and "non-rewarded" groups. Cyclists in the rewarded group received a monetary reward based on highest mean power output across all TTs. Cyclists in the non-rewarded group did not receive a monetary reward. Overall performance was not significantly different between groups in short or long TTs (p > 0.48). Power output showed moderatly lower effect sizes at comencement of the short TTs (Pmeandiff = 36.6 W; d > 0.44) and the 20 km TT (Pmeandiff = 22.6 W; d = 0.44) in the rewarded group. No difference was observed in pacing during the 30 min TT (p = 0.95). An external reward seems to have influenced pacing at the commencement of time trials. Participants in the non-rewarded group adopted a typical parabolic shaped pattern, whereas participants in the rewarded group started trials more conservatively. Results raise the possibility that using money as an extrinsic reward may interfere with regulatory processes required for effective pacing.

Original languageEnglish
Article number741
Pages (from-to)1-11
Number of pages11
JournalFrontiers in Physiology
Volume8
Issue numberSEP
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Sep 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Reward
Athletes

Cite this

@article{1d51c49a6a68437fb4b0b2c173e7a346,
title = "A monetary reward alters pacing but not performance in competitive cyclists",
abstract = "Money has frequently been used as an extrinsic motivator since it is assumed that humans are willing to invest more effort for financial reward. However, the influence of a monetary reward on pacing and performance in trained athletes is not well-understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyse the influence of a monetary reward in well-trained cyclists on their pacing and performance during short and long cycling time trials (TT). Twentythree cyclists (6 ♀, 17 ♂) completed 4 self-paced time trials (TTs, 2 short: 4 km and 6 min; 2 long: 20 km and 30 min); in a randomized order. Participants were separated into parallel, non-randomized {"}rewarded{"} and {"}non-rewarded{"} groups. Cyclists in the rewarded group received a monetary reward based on highest mean power output across all TTs. Cyclists in the non-rewarded group did not receive a monetary reward. Overall performance was not significantly different between groups in short or long TTs (p > 0.48). Power output showed moderatly lower effect sizes at comencement of the short TTs (Pmeandiff = 36.6 W; d > 0.44) and the 20 km TT (Pmeandiff = 22.6 W; d = 0.44) in the rewarded group. No difference was observed in pacing during the 30 min TT (p = 0.95). An external reward seems to have influenced pacing at the commencement of time trials. Participants in the non-rewarded group adopted a typical parabolic shaped pattern, whereas participants in the rewarded group started trials more conservatively. Results raise the possibility that using money as an extrinsic reward may interfere with regulatory processes required for effective pacing.",
keywords = "Cycling, Extrinsic, Monetary reward, Motivation, Pacing strategy, Time trial",
author = "Sabrina Skorski and Thompson, {Kevin G.} and Keegan, {Richard J.} and Tim Meyer and Abbiss, {Chris R.}",
year = "2017",
month = "9",
day = "29",
doi = "10.3389/fphys.2017.00741",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "1--11",
journal = "Frontiers in Physiology",
issn = "1664-042X",
publisher = "Frontiers Media S.A.",
number = "SEP",

}

A monetary reward alters pacing but not performance in competitive cyclists. / Skorski, Sabrina; Thompson, Kevin G.; Keegan, Richard J.; Meyer, Tim; Abbiss, Chris R.

In: Frontiers in Physiology, Vol. 8, No. SEP, 741, 29.09.2017, p. 1-11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - A monetary reward alters pacing but not performance in competitive cyclists

AU - Skorski, Sabrina

AU - Thompson, Kevin G.

AU - Keegan, Richard J.

AU - Meyer, Tim

AU - Abbiss, Chris R.

PY - 2017/9/29

Y1 - 2017/9/29

N2 - Money has frequently been used as an extrinsic motivator since it is assumed that humans are willing to invest more effort for financial reward. However, the influence of a monetary reward on pacing and performance in trained athletes is not well-understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyse the influence of a monetary reward in well-trained cyclists on their pacing and performance during short and long cycling time trials (TT). Twentythree cyclists (6 ♀, 17 ♂) completed 4 self-paced time trials (TTs, 2 short: 4 km and 6 min; 2 long: 20 km and 30 min); in a randomized order. Participants were separated into parallel, non-randomized "rewarded" and "non-rewarded" groups. Cyclists in the rewarded group received a monetary reward based on highest mean power output across all TTs. Cyclists in the non-rewarded group did not receive a monetary reward. Overall performance was not significantly different between groups in short or long TTs (p > 0.48). Power output showed moderatly lower effect sizes at comencement of the short TTs (Pmeandiff = 36.6 W; d > 0.44) and the 20 km TT (Pmeandiff = 22.6 W; d = 0.44) in the rewarded group. No difference was observed in pacing during the 30 min TT (p = 0.95). An external reward seems to have influenced pacing at the commencement of time trials. Participants in the non-rewarded group adopted a typical parabolic shaped pattern, whereas participants in the rewarded group started trials more conservatively. Results raise the possibility that using money as an extrinsic reward may interfere with regulatory processes required for effective pacing.

AB - Money has frequently been used as an extrinsic motivator since it is assumed that humans are willing to invest more effort for financial reward. However, the influence of a monetary reward on pacing and performance in trained athletes is not well-understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyse the influence of a monetary reward in well-trained cyclists on their pacing and performance during short and long cycling time trials (TT). Twentythree cyclists (6 ♀, 17 ♂) completed 4 self-paced time trials (TTs, 2 short: 4 km and 6 min; 2 long: 20 km and 30 min); in a randomized order. Participants were separated into parallel, non-randomized "rewarded" and "non-rewarded" groups. Cyclists in the rewarded group received a monetary reward based on highest mean power output across all TTs. Cyclists in the non-rewarded group did not receive a monetary reward. Overall performance was not significantly different between groups in short or long TTs (p > 0.48). Power output showed moderatly lower effect sizes at comencement of the short TTs (Pmeandiff = 36.6 W; d > 0.44) and the 20 km TT (Pmeandiff = 22.6 W; d = 0.44) in the rewarded group. No difference was observed in pacing during the 30 min TT (p = 0.95). An external reward seems to have influenced pacing at the commencement of time trials. Participants in the non-rewarded group adopted a typical parabolic shaped pattern, whereas participants in the rewarded group started trials more conservatively. Results raise the possibility that using money as an extrinsic reward may interfere with regulatory processes required for effective pacing.

KW - Cycling

KW - Extrinsic

KW - Monetary reward

KW - Motivation

KW - Pacing strategy

KW - Time trial

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85032183548&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3389/fphys.2017.00741

DO - 10.3389/fphys.2017.00741

M3 - Article

VL - 8

SP - 1

EP - 11

JO - Frontiers in Physiology

JF - Frontiers in Physiology

SN - 1664-042X

IS - SEP

M1 - 741

ER -