A new location record for kiore (Rattus exulans) on New Zealand's South Island

W.A. Ruscoe

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    10 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Thirteen kiore (Rattus exulans), also known as the Pacific or Polynesian rat, were trapped in Waitutu Forest, Southland, New Zealand in November 2002 and February 2003. This is a new mainland location for kiore, approximately 75 km south of the closest recorded extant population in the Borland Valley. Kiore remained undetected at Waitutu Forest during the first 18 months of trapping, until the population responded to tree seeding. Morphological characters of the trapped animals are compared with those of previously reported kiore and ship rats (R. rattus), to aid in the correct identification of future captures. Kiore may be more widespread in mainland New Zealand than presently known for reasons of misidentification or trapping when numbers are very low
    Original languageUndefined
    Pages (from-to)1-5
    Number of pages5
    JournalNew Zealand Journal of Zoology
    Volume31
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2004

    Cite this

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    title = "A new location record for kiore (Rattus exulans) on New Zealand's South Island",
    abstract = "Thirteen kiore (Rattus exulans), also known as the Pacific or Polynesian rat, were trapped in Waitutu Forest, Southland, New Zealand in November 2002 and February 2003. This is a new mainland location for kiore, approximately 75 km south of the closest recorded extant population in the Borland Valley. Kiore remained undetected at Waitutu Forest during the first 18 months of trapping, until the population responded to tree seeding. Morphological characters of the trapped animals are compared with those of previously reported kiore and ship rats (R. rattus), to aid in the correct identification of future captures. Kiore may be more widespread in mainland New Zealand than presently known for reasons of misidentification or trapping when numbers are very low",
    author = "W.A. Ruscoe",
    note = "cited By 10",
    year = "2004",
    doi = "10.1080/03014223.2004.9518352",
    language = "Undefined",
    volume = "31",
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    journal = "New Zealand Journal of Zoology",
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    A new location record for kiore (Rattus exulans) on New Zealand's South Island. / Ruscoe, W.A.

    In: New Zealand Journal of Zoology, Vol. 31, No. 1, 2004, p. 1-5.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - A new location record for kiore (Rattus exulans) on New Zealand's South Island

    AU - Ruscoe, W.A.

    N1 - cited By 10

    PY - 2004

    Y1 - 2004

    N2 - Thirteen kiore (Rattus exulans), also known as the Pacific or Polynesian rat, were trapped in Waitutu Forest, Southland, New Zealand in November 2002 and February 2003. This is a new mainland location for kiore, approximately 75 km south of the closest recorded extant population in the Borland Valley. Kiore remained undetected at Waitutu Forest during the first 18 months of trapping, until the population responded to tree seeding. Morphological characters of the trapped animals are compared with those of previously reported kiore and ship rats (R. rattus), to aid in the correct identification of future captures. Kiore may be more widespread in mainland New Zealand than presently known for reasons of misidentification or trapping when numbers are very low

    AB - Thirteen kiore (Rattus exulans), also known as the Pacific or Polynesian rat, were trapped in Waitutu Forest, Southland, New Zealand in November 2002 and February 2003. This is a new mainland location for kiore, approximately 75 km south of the closest recorded extant population in the Borland Valley. Kiore remained undetected at Waitutu Forest during the first 18 months of trapping, until the population responded to tree seeding. Morphological characters of the trapped animals are compared with those of previously reported kiore and ship rats (R. rattus), to aid in the correct identification of future captures. Kiore may be more widespread in mainland New Zealand than presently known for reasons of misidentification or trapping when numbers are very low

    U2 - 10.1080/03014223.2004.9518352

    DO - 10.1080/03014223.2004.9518352

    M3 - Article

    VL - 31

    SP - 1

    EP - 5

    JO - New Zealand Journal of Zoology

    JF - New Zealand Journal of Zoology

    SN - 0301-4223

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    ER -