A pilot study of psychosocial factors and cardiovascular risk amongst Aboriginal people living in the Goulburn Valley

Rachel Reilly, Joyce Doyle, Mark DANIEL, Leeandra Aitken, Vicky Atkinson, Paul Briggs, Julie Calleja, Sharon Charles, Justin Mohamed, Rochelle Patten Patten, Kevin Rowley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: Research has suggested that higher mastery is associated with lower cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. This pilot study investigated how a range of psychosocial factors, including mastery, relate to CVD risk factors among Aboriginal people living in rural south-eastern Australia. Methods: Psychosocial and behavioural measures were obtained via questionnaire as part of developing a cardiovascular risk screening program (The Heart Health Project). Relationships between mastery, social support and other risk-factors were examined. Results: Higher mastery was associated with a greater likelihood of having quit smoking (p=​0.007), higher partner support (p=​0.013) and higher total cholesterol levels (p=​0.004). Results: Higher mastery was associated with a greater likelihood of having quit smoking(p=​0.007), higher partner support (p=​0.013) and higher total cholesterol levels (p=​0.004). Conclusions: Results were consistent with previous studies but suggested that for this population, the relationship between mastery and CVD risk may more complex than expected. Results indicated that mastery may have some utility as a point for intervention to improve health and wellbeing, however further research into these associations and their cultural salience for Aboriginal people is warranted. Objectives: Research has suggested that higher mastery is associated with lower cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. This pilotstudy investigated how a range of psychosocial factors, including mastery, relate to CVD risk factors among Aboriginal people livingin rural south-eastern Australia. Methods: Psychosocial and behavioural measures were obtained via questionnaire as part ofdeveloping a cardiovascular risk screening program (The Heart Health Project). Relationships between mastery, social support andother risk-factors were examined. Results: Higher mastery was associated with a greater likelihood of having quit smoking(p=​0.007), higher partner support (p=​0.013) and higher total cholesterol levels (p=​0.004). Conclusions: Results were consistentwith previous studies but suggested that for this population, the relationship between mastery and CVD risk may more complex thanexpected. Results indicated that mastery may have some utility as a point for intervention to improve health and wellbeing, howeverfurther research into these associations and their cultural salience for Aboriginal people is warranted.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)8-14
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Rural and Tropical Public Health
Volume10
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Cardiovascular Diseases
Psychology
Hypercholesterolemia
South Australia
Smoking
Health
Research
Social Support
Population
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

Reilly, Rachel ; Doyle, Joyce ; DANIEL, Mark ; Aitken, Leeandra ; Atkinson, Vicky ; Briggs, Paul ; Calleja, Julie ; Charles, Sharon ; Mohamed, Justin ; Patten, Rochelle Patten ; Rowley, Kevin . / A pilot study of psychosocial factors and cardiovascular risk amongst Aboriginal people living in the Goulburn Valley. In: Journal of Rural and Tropical Public Health. 2011 ; Vol. 10. pp. 8-14.
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title = "A pilot study of psychosocial factors and cardiovascular risk amongst Aboriginal people living in the Goulburn Valley",
abstract = "Objectives: Research has suggested that higher mastery is associated with lower cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. This pilot study investigated how a range of psychosocial factors, including mastery, relate to CVD risk factors among Aboriginal people living in rural south-eastern Australia. Methods: Psychosocial and behavioural measures were obtained via questionnaire as part of developing a cardiovascular risk screening program (The Heart Health Project). Relationships between mastery, social support and other risk-factors were examined. Results: Higher mastery was associated with a greater likelihood of having quit smoking (p=​0.007), higher partner support (p=​0.013) and higher total cholesterol levels (p=​0.004). Results: Higher mastery was associated with a greater likelihood of having quit smoking(p=​0.007), higher partner support (p=​0.013) and higher total cholesterol levels (p=​0.004). Conclusions: Results were consistent with previous studies but suggested that for this population, the relationship between mastery and CVD risk may more complex than expected. Results indicated that mastery may have some utility as a point for intervention to improve health and wellbeing, however further research into these associations and their cultural salience for Aboriginal people is warranted. Objectives: Research has suggested that higher mastery is associated with lower cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. This pilotstudy investigated how a range of psychosocial factors, including mastery, relate to CVD risk factors among Aboriginal people livingin rural south-eastern Australia. Methods: Psychosocial and behavioural measures were obtained via questionnaire as part ofdeveloping a cardiovascular risk screening program (The Heart Health Project). Relationships between mastery, social support andother risk-factors were examined. Results: Higher mastery was associated with a greater likelihood of having quit smoking(p=​0.007), higher partner support (p=​0.013) and higher total cholesterol levels (p=​0.004). Conclusions: Results were consistentwith previous studies but suggested that for this population, the relationship between mastery and CVD risk may more complex thanexpected. Results indicated that mastery may have some utility as a point for intervention to improve health and wellbeing, howeverfurther research into these associations and their cultural salience for Aboriginal people is warranted.",
author = "Rachel Reilly and Joyce Doyle and Mark DANIEL and Leeandra Aitken and Vicky Atkinson and Paul Briggs and Julie Calleja and Sharon Charles and Justin Mohamed and Patten, {Rochelle Patten} and Kevin Rowley",
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Reilly, R, Doyle, J, DANIEL, M, Aitken, L, Atkinson, V, Briggs, P, Calleja, J, Charles, S, Mohamed, J, Patten, RP & Rowley, K 2011, 'A pilot study of psychosocial factors and cardiovascular risk amongst Aboriginal people living in the Goulburn Valley', Journal of Rural and Tropical Public Health, vol. 10, pp. 8-14.

A pilot study of psychosocial factors and cardiovascular risk amongst Aboriginal people living in the Goulburn Valley. / Reilly, Rachel; Doyle, Joyce; DANIEL, Mark; Aitken, Leeandra; Atkinson, Vicky; Briggs, Paul; Calleja, Julie; Charles, Sharon; Mohamed, Justin; Patten, Rochelle Patten; Rowley, Kevin .

In: Journal of Rural and Tropical Public Health, Vol. 10, 2011, p. 8-14.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - A pilot study of psychosocial factors and cardiovascular risk amongst Aboriginal people living in the Goulburn Valley

AU - Reilly, Rachel

AU - Doyle, Joyce

AU - DANIEL, Mark

AU - Aitken, Leeandra

AU - Atkinson, Vicky

AU - Briggs, Paul

AU - Calleja, Julie

AU - Charles, Sharon

AU - Mohamed, Justin

AU - Patten, Rochelle Patten

AU - Rowley, Kevin

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - Objectives: Research has suggested that higher mastery is associated with lower cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. This pilot study investigated how a range of psychosocial factors, including mastery, relate to CVD risk factors among Aboriginal people living in rural south-eastern Australia. Methods: Psychosocial and behavioural measures were obtained via questionnaire as part of developing a cardiovascular risk screening program (The Heart Health Project). Relationships between mastery, social support and other risk-factors were examined. Results: Higher mastery was associated with a greater likelihood of having quit smoking (p=​0.007), higher partner support (p=​0.013) and higher total cholesterol levels (p=​0.004). Results: Higher mastery was associated with a greater likelihood of having quit smoking(p=​0.007), higher partner support (p=​0.013) and higher total cholesterol levels (p=​0.004). Conclusions: Results were consistent with previous studies but suggested that for this population, the relationship between mastery and CVD risk may more complex than expected. Results indicated that mastery may have some utility as a point for intervention to improve health and wellbeing, however further research into these associations and their cultural salience for Aboriginal people is warranted. Objectives: Research has suggested that higher mastery is associated with lower cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. This pilotstudy investigated how a range of psychosocial factors, including mastery, relate to CVD risk factors among Aboriginal people livingin rural south-eastern Australia. Methods: Psychosocial and behavioural measures were obtained via questionnaire as part ofdeveloping a cardiovascular risk screening program (The Heart Health Project). Relationships between mastery, social support andother risk-factors were examined. Results: Higher mastery was associated with a greater likelihood of having quit smoking(p=​0.007), higher partner support (p=​0.013) and higher total cholesterol levels (p=​0.004). Conclusions: Results were consistentwith previous studies but suggested that for this population, the relationship between mastery and CVD risk may more complex thanexpected. Results indicated that mastery may have some utility as a point for intervention to improve health and wellbeing, howeverfurther research into these associations and their cultural salience for Aboriginal people is warranted.

AB - Objectives: Research has suggested that higher mastery is associated with lower cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. This pilot study investigated how a range of psychosocial factors, including mastery, relate to CVD risk factors among Aboriginal people living in rural south-eastern Australia. Methods: Psychosocial and behavioural measures were obtained via questionnaire as part of developing a cardiovascular risk screening program (The Heart Health Project). Relationships between mastery, social support and other risk-factors were examined. Results: Higher mastery was associated with a greater likelihood of having quit smoking (p=​0.007), higher partner support (p=​0.013) and higher total cholesterol levels (p=​0.004). Results: Higher mastery was associated with a greater likelihood of having quit smoking(p=​0.007), higher partner support (p=​0.013) and higher total cholesterol levels (p=​0.004). Conclusions: Results were consistent with previous studies but suggested that for this population, the relationship between mastery and CVD risk may more complex than expected. Results indicated that mastery may have some utility as a point for intervention to improve health and wellbeing, however further research into these associations and their cultural salience for Aboriginal people is warranted. Objectives: Research has suggested that higher mastery is associated with lower cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. This pilotstudy investigated how a range of psychosocial factors, including mastery, relate to CVD risk factors among Aboriginal people livingin rural south-eastern Australia. Methods: Psychosocial and behavioural measures were obtained via questionnaire as part ofdeveloping a cardiovascular risk screening program (The Heart Health Project). Relationships between mastery, social support andother risk-factors were examined. Results: Higher mastery was associated with a greater likelihood of having quit smoking(p=​0.007), higher partner support (p=​0.013) and higher total cholesterol levels (p=​0.004). Conclusions: Results were consistentwith previous studies but suggested that for this population, the relationship between mastery and CVD risk may more complex thanexpected. Results indicated that mastery may have some utility as a point for intervention to improve health and wellbeing, howeverfurther research into these associations and their cultural salience for Aboriginal people is warranted.

M3 - Article

VL - 10

SP - 8

EP - 14

JO - Journal of Rural and Tropical Public Health

JF - Journal of Rural and Tropical Public Health

SN - 1447-4778

ER -