A possible role for emotion and emotion regulation in physiological responses to false performance feedback in 10 mile laboratory cycling

Christopher J. Beedie, Andrew M. Lane, Mathew G. Wilson

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Abstract

The study investigated responses to false feedback in laboratory cycling. Seven male competitive cyclists (age; M = 34.14 years, SD = 7.40) completed two ergometer time-trials, one each with false negative and false positive feedback (time ± 5 %). MANOVA indicated main effects for condition [F(17, 104) = 9.42, p<0.001], and mile [F(153, 849) = 1.58, p<0.001], but no interaction [F(153, 849) = 0.470, p = 1.00]. No between-condition differences in power (F = 0.129, p = 0.720) or time to completion (F = 1.011, p = 0.338) were observed. Positive feedback was associated with higher glucose (F = 25.988, p<0.01), happiness (F = 6.097, p = 0.015) and calmness (F = 4.088, p = 0.045). Positive feedback was also associate with lower oxygen uptake (F = 8.830, p = 0.004), anxiety (F = 5.207, p = 0.024), gloominess (F = 6.322, p = 0.013), sluggishness (F = 11.650, p = 0.001), down-heartedness (F = 15.844, p = 0.001), effort required to regulate emotion (F = 13.798, p = 0.001), and a trend towards lower lactate production (F = 3.815, p = 0.053). Data suggest that positive emotions and reduced metabolic cost of performance were associated with positive feedback.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)269-277
Number of pages9
JournalApplied Psychophysiology Biofeedback
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2012
Externally publishedYes

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