A randomized trial exploring mindfulness and gratitude exercises as eHealth-based micro-interventions for improving body satisfaction

Matthew Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Ben Richardson, Vivienne Lewis, Jake Linardon, Jacqueline Mills, Kerry Juknaitis, Charlotte Lewis, Kim Coulson, Renee O'Donnell, Lilani Arulkadacham, Anna Ware, Isabel Krug

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite theoretical arguments that brief app-based interventions could be a useful adjunct to longer traditional treatment programs, there has been limited evaluation of the acceptability, feasibility, and efficacy of these micro-interventions. In the present study, 247 women from the general population were randomly assigned to the intervention or wait-list control condition, and provided measurement of body satisfaction and related constructs (body image importance, confidence dealing with body image issues, eating pathology, and self-esteem) at baseline and 21-days (post-intervention). During the 21-day period, the treatment group received access to an eHealth platform containing a series of brief video activities (e.g., gratitude tasks, breathing, and relaxation) previously demonstrated in experimental studies to improve body satisfaction. Findings showed greater improvements in body satisfaction at post-intervention for the intervention group than the waitlist controls (Cohen's d =.42). Use of the intervention content was associated with immediate increases in state-like body satisfaction ratings, and the magnitude of these in-the-moment improvements was predictive of greater post-intervention symptom improvement and retention (ps <.05). However, the intervention did not produce change in constructs related to body satisfaction (Cohen's d ranged from 0.02 to 0.13). Overall, findings offer support for micro-interventions as a spot treatment for specific symptoms, and possible means to maintain engagement and motivation within a broader treatment program.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)58-65
Number of pages8
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume95
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2019

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Mindfulness
Telemedicine
Exercise
Pathology
Application programs
Body Image
Therapeutics
Self Concept
Motivation
Respiration
Eating
E-health
Gratitude
Control Groups
Population

Cite this

Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew ; Richardson, Ben ; Lewis, Vivienne ; Linardon, Jake ; Mills, Jacqueline ; Juknaitis, Kerry ; Lewis, Charlotte ; Coulson, Kim ; O'Donnell, Renee ; Arulkadacham, Lilani ; Ware, Anna ; Krug, Isabel. / A randomized trial exploring mindfulness and gratitude exercises as eHealth-based micro-interventions for improving body satisfaction. In: Computers in Human Behavior. 2019 ; Vol. 95. pp. 58-65.
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Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, M, Richardson, B, Lewis, V, Linardon, J, Mills, J, Juknaitis, K, Lewis, C, Coulson, K, O'Donnell, R, Arulkadacham, L, Ware, A & Krug, I 2019, 'A randomized trial exploring mindfulness and gratitude exercises as eHealth-based micro-interventions for improving body satisfaction', Computers in Human Behavior, vol. 95, pp. 58-65. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2019.01.028

A randomized trial exploring mindfulness and gratitude exercises as eHealth-based micro-interventions for improving body satisfaction. / Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew; Richardson, Ben; Lewis, Vivienne; Linardon, Jake; Mills, Jacqueline; Juknaitis, Kerry; Lewis, Charlotte; Coulson, Kim; O'Donnell, Renee; Arulkadacham, Lilani; Ware, Anna; Krug, Isabel.

In: Computers in Human Behavior, Vol. 95, 06.2019, p. 58-65.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Lewis, Vivienne

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AU - Mills, Jacqueline

AU - Juknaitis, Kerry

AU - Lewis, Charlotte

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AU - O'Donnell, Renee

AU - Arulkadacham, Lilani

AU - Ware, Anna

AU - Krug, Isabel

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