A year of hunger: how the Russia-Ukraine War is worseningclimate-linked food shortages

Research output: Contribution to Newspaper/Magazine/BulletinArticle

Abstract

Global wheat prices have soared since Russia invaded Ukraine in February. The two nations account for 30%of the world’s wheat exports.

That means many low-income nations who are net food importers are bracing for a year of hunger. The disruption of war compounds existing drops in food production linked to climate change. On a global scale, climate change has already cut global average agricultural production by at least one-fifth.

Food insecurity often translates to widespread social unrest, as we saw in the 2011 Arab Spring protests, which came after major food price rises.
Original languageEnglish
Pages1-4
Number of pages4
Volume2022
No.April
Specialist publicationThe Conversation
Publication statusPublished - 27 Apr 2022

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