Academic Freedom in the Social Sciences: The Freedom to Serve Society

Gerlese Akerlind

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The data on which this essay is based were originally collected as part of a larger study investigating Academic Freedom and Commercialisation in Australian Universities (see Kayrooz, Kinnear, & Preston, 2001). A web-based questionnaire survey of social scientists across 12 universities in Australia was completed by 165 respondents (representing a 20% response rate). At the end of the questionnaire, respondents were asked to indicate whether they would be willing to engage in a follow-up telephone interview. Ten of those who indicated their willingness to be interviewed were contacted, and all agreed to the interview
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAutonomy and Social Science Research: the View from United Kingdom and Australia Universities
EditorsCarole Kayrooz, Gerlese Ukerlind, Malcolm Tight
Place of PublicationUK
PublisherJAI Press
Pages31-46
Number of pages16
ISBN (Print)9780762314058
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

social science
studies (academic)
questionnaire
telephone interview
commercialization
social scientist
university
interview
Society

Cite this

Akerlind, G. (2007). Academic Freedom in the Social Sciences: The Freedom to Serve Society. In C. Kayrooz, G. Ukerlind, & M. Tight (Eds.), Autonomy and Social Science Research: the View from United Kingdom and Australia Universities (pp. 31-46). UK: JAI Press. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1479-3628(06)04002-0
Akerlind, Gerlese. / Academic Freedom in the Social Sciences: The Freedom to Serve Society. Autonomy and Social Science Research: the View from United Kingdom and Australia Universities. editor / Carole Kayrooz ; Gerlese Ukerlind ; Malcolm Tight. UK : JAI Press, 2007. pp. 31-46
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Akerlind, G 2007, Academic Freedom in the Social Sciences: The Freedom to Serve Society. in C Kayrooz, G Ukerlind & M Tight (eds), Autonomy and Social Science Research: the View from United Kingdom and Australia Universities. JAI Press, UK, pp. 31-46. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1479-3628(06)04002-0

Academic Freedom in the Social Sciences: The Freedom to Serve Society. / Akerlind, Gerlese.

Autonomy and Social Science Research: the View from United Kingdom and Australia Universities. ed. / Carole Kayrooz; Gerlese Ukerlind; Malcolm Tight. UK : JAI Press, 2007. p. 31-46.

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookChapter

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Akerlind G. Academic Freedom in the Social Sciences: The Freedom to Serve Society. In Kayrooz C, Ukerlind G, Tight M, editors, Autonomy and Social Science Research: the View from United Kingdom and Australia Universities. UK: JAI Press. 2007. p. 31-46 https://doi.org/10.1016/S1479-3628(06)04002-0