Acoustic Sonification of Blood Pressure in the Form of a Singing Bowl

Stephen BARRASS

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

Abstract

The Hypertension Singing Bowl is an Acoustic Sonification shaped by a year of blood pressure data that has been 3D printed in stainless steel so that it rings. The design of the bowl was a response to a medical diagnosis of hypertension that required regular self-tracking of blood pressure. The culture of self-tracking, known as the Quantified Self movement, has the motto "self knowledge through numbers". This paper describes the process of designing and digitally fabricating a singing bowl shaped from this blood pressure data. An iterative design research method is used to identify important stages of the process that include the choice of a sonic metaphor, the prototyping of a CAD baseline, the mapping of data to shape, and the acoustics of the mapping. The resulting Hypertension singing bowl is a meditative contemplation on the dataset that is a reminder to live a healthy lifestyle, and a poetic alternative to generic graphic plots of the Quantified Self
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Conference on Sonification in Health and Environmental Data
EditorsS Pauletto, C Howard, R Rudnicki
Place of PublicationYork
PublisherUniversity of York
Pages16-21
Number of pages6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
EventConference on Sonification in Health and Environmental Data - York, York, United Kingdom
Duration: 12 Sep 201412 Sep 2014

Conference

ConferenceConference on Sonification in Health and Environmental Data
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityYork
Period12/09/1412/09/14

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  • Cite this

    BARRASS, S. (2014). Acoustic Sonification of Blood Pressure in the Form of a Singing Bowl. In S. Pauletto, C. Howard, & R. Rudnicki (Eds.), Proceedings of the Conference on Sonification in Health and Environmental Data (pp. 16-21). University of York. https://doi.org/10.13140/2.1.3365.5041