Adherence to the Mediterranean diet and weight status in children: the role of parental feeding practices

Vassiliki Costarelli, Maria Michou, Demosthenes B. Panagiotakos, Christos Lionis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The study examines Parental Feeding Practices (PFP) in relation to adherence to the Mediterranean Diet (MD) and children’s weight status. It’s a cross-sectional study of 402 parents (68.4% mothers), with children aged 2–12 years. Parents completed the Comprehensive Parental Feeding Questionnaire and the Mediterranean Diet Quality Index for children and adolescents (KIDMED), evaluating children’s adherence to the MD. Logistic regression showed that in children aged 2–<6 years, “emotion regulation/food as reward” and “pressure” decrease MD adherence (OR = 0.186, p < 0.0001 and OR = 0.496, p = 0.004), and “monitoring” decrease excess body weight (OR = 0.284, p = 0.009). In older children (6–12 years), “healthy eating guidance” and “monitoring” increase MD adherence (OR = 3.262, p = 0.001 and OR = 3.147, p < 0.0001), “child control” decreases MD adherence (OR = 0.587, p = 0.049), “pressure” decrease excess body weight (OR = 0.495, p < 0.0001) and “restriction” increase excess body weight (OR = 1.784, p = 0.015). “Healthy eating guidance” and “monitoring” seem to be the best PFP employed, in terms of children’s MD adherence and weight status.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)112-122
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition
Volume72
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021
Externally publishedYes

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