Aligning ‘public good’ environmental stewardship with the landscape-scale

Adapting MBIs for private land conservation policy

Benjamin Cooke, Katie MOON

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Market-based instruments (MBIs) are rapidly becoming a dominant characteristic of the policy landscape for private land conservation in Australia and elsewhere. Price-based MBIs are considered attractive to landholders, who are provided with financial payments for the delivery of defined ecological outcomes on their land, and for policy-making, where ecological return on investment can be measured quantitatively. Consequently, MBIs are commonly used to promote competitive, individualized approaches to improve ecological values, framed around the property-scale. We are concerned that there is a tension between the property-centric focus of price-based MBI programs and the need for environmental management policy and practice to reflect landscape-scale social-ecological processes. Targeting MBI programs at individual properties could risk generating insufficient public good conservation benefits, if those programs fail to reflect the relationship between landscape-scale processes and property-scale conservation efforts. To remedy the neglect of the landscape scale in private land conservation MBI policy, we develop a definition of stewardship that directly connects landscape-scale ecological function to the ‘public good’ dimension of stewardship. We apply this over-arching definition to demonstrate howMBI programs can deliver on the goal of landscape-scale conservation, and to suggest when MBIs might not be well suited to achieving private land conservation objectives.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)152-158
Number of pages7
JournalEcological Economics
Volume114
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

private land
market
arching
land conservation
conservation policy
Market-based instruments
Stewardship
Conservation policy
Land conservation
policy making
environmental management
targeting
programme
policy
Conservation

Cite this

@article{8728d465746e4571bb6e8eb3e5d85bdf,
title = "Aligning ‘public good’ environmental stewardship with the landscape-scale: Adapting MBIs for private land conservation policy",
abstract = "Market-based instruments (MBIs) are rapidly becoming a dominant characteristic of the policy landscape for private land conservation in Australia and elsewhere. Price-based MBIs are considered attractive to landholders, who are provided with financial payments for the delivery of defined ecological outcomes on their land, and for policy-making, where ecological return on investment can be measured quantitatively. Consequently, MBIs are commonly used to promote competitive, individualized approaches to improve ecological values, framed around the property-scale. We are concerned that there is a tension between the property-centric focus of price-based MBI programs and the need for environmental management policy and practice to reflect landscape-scale social-ecological processes. Targeting MBI programs at individual properties could risk generating insufficient public good conservation benefits, if those programs fail to reflect the relationship between landscape-scale processes and property-scale conservation efforts. To remedy the neglect of the landscape scale in private land conservation MBI policy, we develop a definition of stewardship that directly connects landscape-scale ecological function to the ‘public good’ dimension of stewardship. We apply this over-arching definition to demonstrate howMBI programs can deliver on the goal of landscape-scale conservation, and to suggest when MBIs might not be well suited to achieving private land conservation objectives.",
keywords = "Collaborative management, Landscape scale, Market-based instruments, Private land conservation policy, Public good, Stewardship",
author = "Benjamin Cooke and Katie MOON",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1016/j.ecolecon.2015.03.027",
language = "English",
volume = "114",
pages = "152--158",
journal = "Ecological Economics",
issn = "0921-8009",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

Aligning ‘public good’ environmental stewardship with the landscape-scale : Adapting MBIs for private land conservation policy. / Cooke, Benjamin; MOON, Katie.

In: Ecological Economics, Vol. 114, 2015, p. 152-158.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Aligning ‘public good’ environmental stewardship with the landscape-scale

T2 - Adapting MBIs for private land conservation policy

AU - Cooke, Benjamin

AU - MOON, Katie

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Market-based instruments (MBIs) are rapidly becoming a dominant characteristic of the policy landscape for private land conservation in Australia and elsewhere. Price-based MBIs are considered attractive to landholders, who are provided with financial payments for the delivery of defined ecological outcomes on their land, and for policy-making, where ecological return on investment can be measured quantitatively. Consequently, MBIs are commonly used to promote competitive, individualized approaches to improve ecological values, framed around the property-scale. We are concerned that there is a tension between the property-centric focus of price-based MBI programs and the need for environmental management policy and practice to reflect landscape-scale social-ecological processes. Targeting MBI programs at individual properties could risk generating insufficient public good conservation benefits, if those programs fail to reflect the relationship between landscape-scale processes and property-scale conservation efforts. To remedy the neglect of the landscape scale in private land conservation MBI policy, we develop a definition of stewardship that directly connects landscape-scale ecological function to the ‘public good’ dimension of stewardship. We apply this over-arching definition to demonstrate howMBI programs can deliver on the goal of landscape-scale conservation, and to suggest when MBIs might not be well suited to achieving private land conservation objectives.

AB - Market-based instruments (MBIs) are rapidly becoming a dominant characteristic of the policy landscape for private land conservation in Australia and elsewhere. Price-based MBIs are considered attractive to landholders, who are provided with financial payments for the delivery of defined ecological outcomes on their land, and for policy-making, where ecological return on investment can be measured quantitatively. Consequently, MBIs are commonly used to promote competitive, individualized approaches to improve ecological values, framed around the property-scale. We are concerned that there is a tension between the property-centric focus of price-based MBI programs and the need for environmental management policy and practice to reflect landscape-scale social-ecological processes. Targeting MBI programs at individual properties could risk generating insufficient public good conservation benefits, if those programs fail to reflect the relationship between landscape-scale processes and property-scale conservation efforts. To remedy the neglect of the landscape scale in private land conservation MBI policy, we develop a definition of stewardship that directly connects landscape-scale ecological function to the ‘public good’ dimension of stewardship. We apply this over-arching definition to demonstrate howMBI programs can deliver on the goal of landscape-scale conservation, and to suggest when MBIs might not be well suited to achieving private land conservation objectives.

KW - Collaborative management

KW - Landscape scale

KW - Market-based instruments

KW - Private land conservation policy

KW - Public good

KW - Stewardship

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84926063985&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.mendeley.com/research/aligning-public-good-environmental-stewardship-landscapescale-adapting-mbis-private-land-conservatio

U2 - 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2015.03.027

DO - 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2015.03.027

M3 - Review article

VL - 114

SP - 152

EP - 158

JO - Ecological Economics

JF - Ecological Economics

SN - 0921-8009

ER -