An online intervention for reducing depressive symptoms: Secondary benefits for self-esteem, empowerment and quality of life

Dimity Crisp, Kathleen Griffiths, Andrew Mackinnon, Kylie Bennett, Helen Christensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Internet-based interventions are increasingly recognized as effective for the treatment and prevention of depression; however, there is a paucity of research investigating potential secondary benefits. From a consumer perspective, improvements in indicators of wellbeing such as perceived quality of life may represent the most important outcomes for evaluating the effectiveness of an intervention. This study investigated the ‘secondary’ benefits for self-esteem, empowerment, quality of life and perceived social support of two 12-week online depression interventions when delivered alone and in combination. Participants comprised 298 adults displaying elevated psychological distress. Participants were randomised to receive: an Internet Support Group (ISG); an automated Internet psycho-educational training program for depression; a combination of these conditions; or a control website. Analyses were performed on an intent-to-treat basis. Following the automated training program immediate improvements were shown in participants? self-esteem and empowerment relative to control participants. Improvements in perceived quality of life were reported 6-months following the completion of the intervention when combined with an ISG. These findings provide initial evidence for the effectiveness of this online intervention for improving individual wellbeing beyond the primary aim of the treatment. However, further research is required to investigate the mechanisms underlying improvement in these secondary outcomes.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)60-66
Number of pages7
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume216
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Apr 2014

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Self Concept
Internet
Quality of Life
Depression
Self-Help Groups
Education
Research
Social Support
Psychology
Power (Psychology)

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Crisp, Dimity ; Griffiths, Kathleen ; Mackinnon, Andrew ; Bennett, Kylie ; Christensen, Helen. / An online intervention for reducing depressive symptoms: Secondary benefits for self-esteem, empowerment and quality of life. In: Psychiatry Research. 2014 ; Vol. 216, No. 1. pp. 60-66.
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An online intervention for reducing depressive symptoms: Secondary benefits for self-esteem, empowerment and quality of life. / Crisp, Dimity; Griffiths, Kathleen; Mackinnon, Andrew; Bennett, Kylie; Christensen, Helen.

In: Psychiatry Research, Vol. 216, No. 1, 30.04.2014, p. 60-66.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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