An Unseen Weakening of Fairfax's Journalism Culture: The Impact of Copy Sharing in The Age, Sydney Morning herald and Canberra Times Books Pages

Matthew RICKETSON, DR Sybil Nolan

    Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

    Abstract

    The value of covering new books and literary culture in Australian newspapers has been widely accepted even if it has not been widely studied in journalism scholarship. The massive transformation of media in the Web 2.0 era has affected the Australian press in numerous ways, collapsing its well-established business model and driving publishers to offer print journalism online. The impact on newspaper journalists can be seen immediately in the large numbers that have been made redundant or have taken packages in recent years. More difficult to assess is the undoubted impact of such wholesale change on the cultural authority associated with print journalism and on Australian journalism culture itself. This conference paper focuses on one aspect of newspaper journalism in an effort to engage with these questions. It examines how the transformed media climate has affected Australian newspapers’ coverage of books and literary culture, by describing and analysing the expansion of copy sharing in the books pages of Fairfax Media’s three metropolitan daily newspapers, The Age, The Sydney Morning Herald and The Canberra Times.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationChallenging Identities, Institutions and Communities: Refereed Proceedings of the TASA 2014
    EditorsBrad West
    Place of PublicationAdelaide
    PublisherThe University of Queensland Press
    Pages1-20
    Number of pages20
    ISBN (Print)9780646927350
    Publication statusPublished - 2014
    EventThe Australian Sociological Association Annual Conference, TASA 2014: Challenging Identities, Institutions and Communities - University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia
    Duration: 24 Nov 201427 Nov 2014
    https://tasa.org.au/tasa-conference/host-the-2014-tasa-conference-call-for-expressions-of-interest/

    Conference

    ConferenceThe Australian Sociological Association Annual Conference, TASA 2014
    Abbreviated titleTASA 2014
    CountryAustralia
    CityAdelaide
    Period24/11/1427/11/14
    OtherThe conference theme– Challenging Identities, Institutions and Communities – is designed to encourage presentations on social, cultural and political change as it occurs locally, nationally and globally, as well as critical reflections on the power of social groupings in facilitating or resisting these directions
    Internet address

    Fingerprint

    Canberra
    Journalism
    Herald
    Literary Culture
    Daily Newspapers
    Metropolitan
    Newspaper Coverage
    Climate
    Journalists
    Authority
    Conference Papers
    Web 2.0

    Cite this

    RICKETSON, M., & Nolan, DR. S. (2014). An Unseen Weakening of Fairfax's Journalism Culture: The Impact of Copy Sharing in The Age, Sydney Morning herald and Canberra Times Books Pages. In B. West (Ed.), Challenging Identities, Institutions and Communities: Refereed Proceedings of the TASA 2014 (pp. 1-20). Adelaide: The University of Queensland Press.
    RICKETSON, Matthew ; Nolan, DR Sybil. / An Unseen Weakening of Fairfax's Journalism Culture: The Impact of Copy Sharing in The Age, Sydney Morning herald and Canberra Times Books Pages. Challenging Identities, Institutions and Communities: Refereed Proceedings of the TASA 2014. editor / Brad West. Adelaide : The University of Queensland Press, 2014. pp. 1-20
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    title = "An Unseen Weakening of Fairfax's Journalism Culture: The Impact of Copy Sharing in The Age, Sydney Morning herald and Canberra Times Books Pages",
    abstract = "The value of covering new books and literary culture in Australian newspapers has been widely accepted even if it has not been widely studied in journalism scholarship. The massive transformation of media in the Web 2.0 era has affected the Australian press in numerous ways, collapsing its well-established business model and driving publishers to offer print journalism online. The impact on newspaper journalists can be seen immediately in the large numbers that have been made redundant or have taken packages in recent years. More difficult to assess is the undoubted impact of such wholesale change on the cultural authority associated with print journalism and on Australian journalism culture itself. This conference paper focuses on one aspect of newspaper journalism in an effort to engage with these questions. It examines how the transformed media climate has affected Australian newspapers’ coverage of books and literary culture, by describing and analysing the expansion of copy sharing in the books pages of Fairfax Media’s three metropolitan daily newspapers, The Age, The Sydney Morning Herald and The Canberra Times.",
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    publisher = "The University of Queensland Press",

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    RICKETSON, M & Nolan, DRS 2014, An Unseen Weakening of Fairfax's Journalism Culture: The Impact of Copy Sharing in The Age, Sydney Morning herald and Canberra Times Books Pages. in B West (ed.), Challenging Identities, Institutions and Communities: Refereed Proceedings of the TASA 2014. The University of Queensland Press, Adelaide, pp. 1-20, The Australian Sociological Association Annual Conference, TASA 2014, Adelaide, Australia, 24/11/14.

    An Unseen Weakening of Fairfax's Journalism Culture: The Impact of Copy Sharing in The Age, Sydney Morning herald and Canberra Times Books Pages. / RICKETSON, Matthew; Nolan, DR Sybil.

    Challenging Identities, Institutions and Communities: Refereed Proceedings of the TASA 2014. ed. / Brad West. Adelaide : The University of Queensland Press, 2014. p. 1-20.

    Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

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    N2 - The value of covering new books and literary culture in Australian newspapers has been widely accepted even if it has not been widely studied in journalism scholarship. The massive transformation of media in the Web 2.0 era has affected the Australian press in numerous ways, collapsing its well-established business model and driving publishers to offer print journalism online. The impact on newspaper journalists can be seen immediately in the large numbers that have been made redundant or have taken packages in recent years. More difficult to assess is the undoubted impact of such wholesale change on the cultural authority associated with print journalism and on Australian journalism culture itself. This conference paper focuses on one aspect of newspaper journalism in an effort to engage with these questions. It examines how the transformed media climate has affected Australian newspapers’ coverage of books and literary culture, by describing and analysing the expansion of copy sharing in the books pages of Fairfax Media’s three metropolitan daily newspapers, The Age, The Sydney Morning Herald and The Canberra Times.

    AB - The value of covering new books and literary culture in Australian newspapers has been widely accepted even if it has not been widely studied in journalism scholarship. The massive transformation of media in the Web 2.0 era has affected the Australian press in numerous ways, collapsing its well-established business model and driving publishers to offer print journalism online. The impact on newspaper journalists can be seen immediately in the large numbers that have been made redundant or have taken packages in recent years. More difficult to assess is the undoubted impact of such wholesale change on the cultural authority associated with print journalism and on Australian journalism culture itself. This conference paper focuses on one aspect of newspaper journalism in an effort to engage with these questions. It examines how the transformed media climate has affected Australian newspapers’ coverage of books and literary culture, by describing and analysing the expansion of copy sharing in the books pages of Fairfax Media’s three metropolitan daily newspapers, The Age, The Sydney Morning Herald and The Canberra Times.

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    RICKETSON M, Nolan DRS. An Unseen Weakening of Fairfax's Journalism Culture: The Impact of Copy Sharing in The Age, Sydney Morning herald and Canberra Times Books Pages. In West B, editor, Challenging Identities, Institutions and Communities: Refereed Proceedings of the TASA 2014. Adelaide: The University of Queensland Press. 2014. p. 1-20