Anthropometric and Power-Related Attributes Differ Between Competition Levels in Age-Matched Under-19-Year-Old Male Basketball Players

Markus N C Williams, Neal Wen, David B Pyne, Davide Ferioli, Daniele Conte, Vincent J Dalbo, Aaron T Scanlan

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    PURPOSE: To compare anthropometric and power-related attributes between competition levels in under-19-year-old (U19) male basketball players.

    METHODS: National-level (n = 7; age: 17.7 [0.5] y), first-division state-level (n = 8; 17.4 [0.4] y), and second-division state-level (n = 8; 17.1 [0.4] y) players from Australian basketball programs participated in this pilot study. Players had various anthropometric attributes (height, standing reach height, wingspan, and body mass) and power-related attributes (isometric midthigh pull, linear sprint, countermovement jump, 1-step vertical jump, standing long jump, repeated lateral bound, and Modified Agility T Test) measured in the preseason. Differences between groups were assessed using 1-way analyses of variance with Tukey post hoc tests and effect sizes (ES) interpreted as trivial, <0.20; small, 0.20 to 0.59; moderate, 0.60 to 1.19; large, 1.20 to 1.99; and very large, ≥2.00.

    RESULTS: Regarding anthropometric attributes, national-level players possessed greater (P < .05, large-very large) height (ES = 2.09), standing reach height (ES = 1.54), wingspan (ES = 1.45), and body mass (ES = 1.77) than second-division state-level players. For power-related attributes, national-level players possessed greater (P < .05, large-very large) isometric midthigh-pull peak force (ES = 1.46-2.57), sprint momentum (ES = 1.17-2.18), and countermovement jump peak force (ES = 1.73-2.01) than state-level players. Moreover, national-level players demonstrated greater (P < .05) 1-step vertical jump height (ES = 1.95, large) than second division state-level players.

    CONCLUSIONS: Specific anthropometric and power-related attributes clearly differ between competition levels in U19 male basketball players. This information can inform development of testing protocols, reference ranges, and training programs in practice. Further research is encouraged on this topic to confirm our findings across larger samples of basketball players.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)562-568
    Number of pages7
    JournalInternational Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
    Volume17
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2022

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