Apolipoprotein A1 (Apo-A1) distribution pattern in the human Achilles tendon

James Gaida, Håkan Alfredson, Alex Scott, Rouhollah Mousavizadeh, Sture Forsgren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Metabolic factors such as cholesterol appear to play an important role in the development of Achilles tendinopathy. There is, however, no morphologic proof explaining the link between high cholesterol and tendinopathy. As apolipoprotein A1 (Apo-A1) is essential for reverse cholesterol transport, it may be related to cholesterol overload in tendon. Nothing is known about Apo-A1 expression in tendon tissue. We examined the distribution of Apo-A1 protein in biopsies from normal and tendinopathy affected human Achilles tendons, and APOA1 mRNA production from cultured human hamstring tenocytes.
Specific immunoreactions for Apo-A1 were detected. The tenocytes showed specific Apo-A1 immunoreactions. These reactions were usually distinct in the tendinopathy specimens. While the tendinopathy specimens often showed granular/small deposit reactions, the slender tenocytes of control specimens did not show this pattern. The magnitude of Apo-A1 immunoreactivity was especially marked in the tendinopathy specimens, as there is a high number of tenocytes. Reactions were also seen in the walls of blood vessels located within the tendon tissue proper of both the normal and tendinopathy tendons and within the peritendinous / fatty tissue of the tendinopathy tendons. The reactions were predominantly in the form of deposit reactions within the smooth muscle layer of the vessel walls. Cultured hamstring tenocytes produced APOA1 mRNA.
We demonstrated the presence of Apo-A1 in human tendon tissue. This suggests there may be a link between Achilles tendinopathy and cholesterol metabolism. We hypothesise that Apo-A1 may be important for tenocyte and blood vessel function within tendons.
LanguageEnglish
JournalScandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 3 Jan 2018

Fingerprint

Tendinopathy
Achilles Tendon
Apolipoprotein A-I
Tendons
Cholesterol
Blood Vessels
Messenger RNA
Smooth Muscle
Adipose Tissue
Tenocytes
Biopsy

Cite this

@article{dab4fa7a082b471b9310b2b203faf80f,
title = "Apolipoprotein A1 (Apo-A1) distribution pattern in the human Achilles tendon",
abstract = "Metabolic factors such as cholesterol appear to play an important role in the development of Achilles tendinopathy. There is, however, no morphologic proof explaining the link between high cholesterol and tendinopathy. As apolipoprotein A1 (Apo-A1) is essential for reverse cholesterol transport, it may be related to cholesterol overload in tendon. Nothing is known about Apo-A1 expression in tendon tissue. We examined the distribution of Apo-A1 protein in biopsies from normal and tendinopathy affected human Achilles tendons, and APOA1 mRNA production from cultured human hamstring tenocytes.Specific immunoreactions for Apo-A1 were detected. The tenocytes showed specific Apo-A1 immunoreactions. These reactions were usually distinct in the tendinopathy specimens. While the tendinopathy specimens often showed granular/small deposit reactions, the slender tenocytes of control specimens did not show this pattern. The magnitude of Apo-A1 immunoreactivity was especially marked in the tendinopathy specimens, as there is a high number of tenocytes. Reactions were also seen in the walls of blood vessels located within the tendon tissue proper of both the normal and tendinopathy tendons and within the peritendinous / fatty tissue of the tendinopathy tendons. The reactions were predominantly in the form of deposit reactions within the smooth muscle layer of the vessel walls. Cultured hamstring tenocytes produced APOA1 mRNA.We demonstrated the presence of Apo-A1 in human tendon tissue. This suggests there may be a link between Achilles tendinopathy and cholesterol metabolism. We hypothesise that Apo-A1 may be important for tenocyte and blood vessel function within tendons.",
keywords = "Immunohistochemistry, Apo-A1, tendinopathy, tendon, reverse cholesterol transport, HDL-C",
author = "James Gaida and H{\aa}kan Alfredson and Alex Scott and Rouhollah Mousavizadeh and Sture Forsgren",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "3",
doi = "10.1111/sms.13051",
language = "English",
journal = "Scandinavian Journal of Sports Sciences",
issn = "0905-7188",
publisher = "Blackwell Munksgaard",

}

Apolipoprotein A1 (Apo-A1) distribution pattern in the human Achilles tendon. / Gaida, James; Alfredson, Håkan; Scott, Alex; Mousavizadeh, Rouhollah; Forsgren, Sture.

In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, 03.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Apolipoprotein A1 (Apo-A1) distribution pattern in the human Achilles tendon

AU - Gaida,James

AU - Alfredson,Håkan

AU - Scott,Alex

AU - Mousavizadeh,Rouhollah

AU - Forsgren,Sture

PY - 2018/1/3

Y1 - 2018/1/3

N2 - Metabolic factors such as cholesterol appear to play an important role in the development of Achilles tendinopathy. There is, however, no morphologic proof explaining the link between high cholesterol and tendinopathy. As apolipoprotein A1 (Apo-A1) is essential for reverse cholesterol transport, it may be related to cholesterol overload in tendon. Nothing is known about Apo-A1 expression in tendon tissue. We examined the distribution of Apo-A1 protein in biopsies from normal and tendinopathy affected human Achilles tendons, and APOA1 mRNA production from cultured human hamstring tenocytes.Specific immunoreactions for Apo-A1 were detected. The tenocytes showed specific Apo-A1 immunoreactions. These reactions were usually distinct in the tendinopathy specimens. While the tendinopathy specimens often showed granular/small deposit reactions, the slender tenocytes of control specimens did not show this pattern. The magnitude of Apo-A1 immunoreactivity was especially marked in the tendinopathy specimens, as there is a high number of tenocytes. Reactions were also seen in the walls of blood vessels located within the tendon tissue proper of both the normal and tendinopathy tendons and within the peritendinous / fatty tissue of the tendinopathy tendons. The reactions were predominantly in the form of deposit reactions within the smooth muscle layer of the vessel walls. Cultured hamstring tenocytes produced APOA1 mRNA.We demonstrated the presence of Apo-A1 in human tendon tissue. This suggests there may be a link between Achilles tendinopathy and cholesterol metabolism. We hypothesise that Apo-A1 may be important for tenocyte and blood vessel function within tendons.

AB - Metabolic factors such as cholesterol appear to play an important role in the development of Achilles tendinopathy. There is, however, no morphologic proof explaining the link between high cholesterol and tendinopathy. As apolipoprotein A1 (Apo-A1) is essential for reverse cholesterol transport, it may be related to cholesterol overload in tendon. Nothing is known about Apo-A1 expression in tendon tissue. We examined the distribution of Apo-A1 protein in biopsies from normal and tendinopathy affected human Achilles tendons, and APOA1 mRNA production from cultured human hamstring tenocytes.Specific immunoreactions for Apo-A1 were detected. The tenocytes showed specific Apo-A1 immunoreactions. These reactions were usually distinct in the tendinopathy specimens. While the tendinopathy specimens often showed granular/small deposit reactions, the slender tenocytes of control specimens did not show this pattern. The magnitude of Apo-A1 immunoreactivity was especially marked in the tendinopathy specimens, as there is a high number of tenocytes. Reactions were also seen in the walls of blood vessels located within the tendon tissue proper of both the normal and tendinopathy tendons and within the peritendinous / fatty tissue of the tendinopathy tendons. The reactions were predominantly in the form of deposit reactions within the smooth muscle layer of the vessel walls. Cultured hamstring tenocytes produced APOA1 mRNA.We demonstrated the presence of Apo-A1 in human tendon tissue. This suggests there may be a link between Achilles tendinopathy and cholesterol metabolism. We hypothesise that Apo-A1 may be important for tenocyte and blood vessel function within tendons.

KW - Immunohistochemistry

KW - Apo-A1

KW - tendinopathy

KW - tendon

KW - reverse cholesterol transport

KW - HDL-C

U2 - 10.1111/sms.13051

DO - 10.1111/sms.13051

M3 - Article

JO - Scandinavian Journal of Sports Sciences

T2 - Scandinavian Journal of Sports Sciences

JF - Scandinavian Journal of Sports Sciences

SN - 0905-7188

ER -