Applications of Animal Models of Infectious Arthritis in Drug Discovery: A focus on Alphaviral Disease

Lara Herrero, Michelle Nelson, Michelle Gahan, Suresh Mahalingham

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    6 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Animal models, which mimic human disease, are invaluable tools for understanding the mechanisms of disease pathogenesis and development of treatment strategies. In particular, animal models play important roles in the area of infectious arthritis. Alphaviruses, including Ross River virus (RRV), o'nyong-nyong virus, chikungunya virus (CHIKV), mayaro virus, Semliki Forest virus and sindbis virus, are globally distributed and cause transient illness characterized by fever, rash, myalgia, arthralgia and arthritis in humans. Severe forms of the disease result in chronic incapacitating arthralgia and arthritis. The mechanisms of how these viruses cause musculoskeletal disease are ill defined. In recent years, the use of a mouse model for RRV-induced disease has assisted in unraveling the pathobiology of infection and in discovering novel drugs to ameliorate disease. RRV as an infection model has the potential to provide key insights into such disease processes, particularly as many viruses, other than alphaviruses, are known to cause infectious arthritides. The emergence and outbreak of CHIKV in many parts of the world has necessitated the need to develop animal models of CHIKV disease. The development of non-human primate models of CHIKV disease has given insights into viral tropism and disease pathogenesis and facilitated the development of new treatment strategies. This review highlights the application of animal models of alphaviral diseases in the fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that contribute to disease and for defining the role that the immune response may have on disease pathogenesis, with the view of providing the foundation for new treatments.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1024-1036
    Number of pages13
    JournalCurrent Drug Targets
    Volume12
    Issue number7
    Publication statusPublished - 2011

    Fingerprint

    Infectious Arthritis
    Drug Discovery
    Viruses
    Chikungunya virus
    Animals
    Animal Models
    Virus Diseases
    Ross River virus
    Alphavirus
    Arthralgia
    Arthritis
    Viral Tropism
    Musculoskeletal Diseases
    Semliki forest virus
    Sindbis Virus
    Animal Disease Models
    Rivers
    Myalgia
    Human Development
    Exanthema

    Cite this

    Herrero, L., Nelson, M., Gahan, M., & Mahalingham, S. (2011). Applications of Animal Models of Infectious Arthritis in Drug Discovery: A focus on Alphaviral Disease. Current Drug Targets, 12(7), 1024-1036.
    Herrero, Lara ; Nelson, Michelle ; Gahan, Michelle ; Mahalingham, Suresh. / Applications of Animal Models of Infectious Arthritis in Drug Discovery: A focus on Alphaviral Disease. In: Current Drug Targets. 2011 ; Vol. 12, No. 7. pp. 1024-1036.
    @article{800452195dce4b0caab0469b5d5eb37e,
    title = "Applications of Animal Models of Infectious Arthritis in Drug Discovery: A focus on Alphaviral Disease",
    abstract = "Animal models, which mimic human disease, are invaluable tools for understanding the mechanisms of disease pathogenesis and development of treatment strategies. In particular, animal models play important roles in the area of infectious arthritis. Alphaviruses, including Ross River virus (RRV), o'nyong-nyong virus, chikungunya virus (CHIKV), mayaro virus, Semliki Forest virus and sindbis virus, are globally distributed and cause transient illness characterized by fever, rash, myalgia, arthralgia and arthritis in humans. Severe forms of the disease result in chronic incapacitating arthralgia and arthritis. The mechanisms of how these viruses cause musculoskeletal disease are ill defined. In recent years, the use of a mouse model for RRV-induced disease has assisted in unraveling the pathobiology of infection and in discovering novel drugs to ameliorate disease. RRV as an infection model has the potential to provide key insights into such disease processes, particularly as many viruses, other than alphaviruses, are known to cause infectious arthritides. The emergence and outbreak of CHIKV in many parts of the world has necessitated the need to develop animal models of CHIKV disease. The development of non-human primate models of CHIKV disease has given insights into viral tropism and disease pathogenesis and facilitated the development of new treatment strategies. This review highlights the application of animal models of alphaviral diseases in the fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that contribute to disease and for defining the role that the immune response may have on disease pathogenesis, with the view of providing the foundation for new treatments.",
    author = "Lara Herrero and Michelle Nelson and Michelle Gahan and Suresh Mahalingham",
    year = "2011",
    language = "English",
    volume = "12",
    pages = "1024--1036",
    journal = "Current Drug Targets",
    issn = "1389-4501",
    publisher = "Bentham Science Publishers B.V.",
    number = "7",

    }

    Herrero, L, Nelson, M, Gahan, M & Mahalingham, S 2011, 'Applications of Animal Models of Infectious Arthritis in Drug Discovery: A focus on Alphaviral Disease', Current Drug Targets, vol. 12, no. 7, pp. 1024-1036.

    Applications of Animal Models of Infectious Arthritis in Drug Discovery: A focus on Alphaviral Disease. / Herrero, Lara; Nelson, Michelle; Gahan, Michelle; Mahalingham, Suresh.

    In: Current Drug Targets, Vol. 12, No. 7, 2011, p. 1024-1036.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Applications of Animal Models of Infectious Arthritis in Drug Discovery: A focus on Alphaviral Disease

    AU - Herrero, Lara

    AU - Nelson, Michelle

    AU - Gahan, Michelle

    AU - Mahalingham, Suresh

    PY - 2011

    Y1 - 2011

    N2 - Animal models, which mimic human disease, are invaluable tools for understanding the mechanisms of disease pathogenesis and development of treatment strategies. In particular, animal models play important roles in the area of infectious arthritis. Alphaviruses, including Ross River virus (RRV), o'nyong-nyong virus, chikungunya virus (CHIKV), mayaro virus, Semliki Forest virus and sindbis virus, are globally distributed and cause transient illness characterized by fever, rash, myalgia, arthralgia and arthritis in humans. Severe forms of the disease result in chronic incapacitating arthralgia and arthritis. The mechanisms of how these viruses cause musculoskeletal disease are ill defined. In recent years, the use of a mouse model for RRV-induced disease has assisted in unraveling the pathobiology of infection and in discovering novel drugs to ameliorate disease. RRV as an infection model has the potential to provide key insights into such disease processes, particularly as many viruses, other than alphaviruses, are known to cause infectious arthritides. The emergence and outbreak of CHIKV in many parts of the world has necessitated the need to develop animal models of CHIKV disease. The development of non-human primate models of CHIKV disease has given insights into viral tropism and disease pathogenesis and facilitated the development of new treatment strategies. This review highlights the application of animal models of alphaviral diseases in the fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that contribute to disease and for defining the role that the immune response may have on disease pathogenesis, with the view of providing the foundation for new treatments.

    AB - Animal models, which mimic human disease, are invaluable tools for understanding the mechanisms of disease pathogenesis and development of treatment strategies. In particular, animal models play important roles in the area of infectious arthritis. Alphaviruses, including Ross River virus (RRV), o'nyong-nyong virus, chikungunya virus (CHIKV), mayaro virus, Semliki Forest virus and sindbis virus, are globally distributed and cause transient illness characterized by fever, rash, myalgia, arthralgia and arthritis in humans. Severe forms of the disease result in chronic incapacitating arthralgia and arthritis. The mechanisms of how these viruses cause musculoskeletal disease are ill defined. In recent years, the use of a mouse model for RRV-induced disease has assisted in unraveling the pathobiology of infection and in discovering novel drugs to ameliorate disease. RRV as an infection model has the potential to provide key insights into such disease processes, particularly as many viruses, other than alphaviruses, are known to cause infectious arthritides. The emergence and outbreak of CHIKV in many parts of the world has necessitated the need to develop animal models of CHIKV disease. The development of non-human primate models of CHIKV disease has given insights into viral tropism and disease pathogenesis and facilitated the development of new treatment strategies. This review highlights the application of animal models of alphaviral diseases in the fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that contribute to disease and for defining the role that the immune response may have on disease pathogenesis, with the view of providing the foundation for new treatments.

    M3 - Article

    VL - 12

    SP - 1024

    EP - 1036

    JO - Current Drug Targets

    JF - Current Drug Targets

    SN - 1389-4501

    IS - 7

    ER -