Area-level socioeconomic characteristics and incidence of metabolic syndrome: A prospective cohort study

Anhduc Ngo, Catherine Paquet, Natasha Howard, Neil COFFEE, Robert Adams, Anne Taylor, Mark DANIEL

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13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background
The evidence linking socioeconomic environments and metabolic syndrome (MetS) has primarily been based on cross-sectional studies. This study prospectively examined the relationships between area-level socioeconomic position (SEP) and the incidence of MetS.

Methods
A prospective cohort study design was employed involving 1,877 men and women aged 18+ living in metropolitan Adelaide, Australia, all free of MetS at baseline. Area-level SEP measures, derived from Census data, included proportion of residents completing a university education, and median household weekly income. MetS, defined according to International Diabetes Federation, was ascertained after an average of 3.6 years follow up. Associations between each area-level SEP measure and incident MetS were examined by Poisson regression Generalised Estimating Equations models. Interaction between area- and individual-level SEP variables was also tested.

Results
A total of 156 men (18.7%) and 153 women (13.1%) developed MetS. Each percentage increase in the proportion of residents with a university education corresponded to a 2% lower risk of developing MetS (age and sex-adjusted incidence risk ratio (RR) = 0.98; 95% confidence interval (CI) =0.97-0.99). This association persisted after adjustment for individual-level income, education, and health behaviours. There was no significant association between area-level income and incident MetS overall. For the high income participants, however, a one standard deviation increase in median household weekly income was associated with a 29% higher risk of developing MetS (Adjusted RR = 1.29; 95%CI = 1.04-1.60).

Conclusions
While area-level education was independently and inversely associated with the risk of developing MetS, the association between area-level income and the MetS incidence was modified by individual-level income
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-11
Number of pages11
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Incidence
Education
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Health Behavior
Censuses
Cross-Sectional Studies

Cite this

Ngo, Anhduc ; Paquet, Catherine ; Howard, Natasha ; COFFEE, Neil ; Adams, Robert ; Taylor, Anne ; DANIEL, Mark. / Area-level socioeconomic characteristics and incidence of metabolic syndrome: A prospective cohort study. In: BMC Public Health. 2013 ; Vol. 13, No. 1. pp. 1-11.
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abstract = "BackgroundThe evidence linking socioeconomic environments and metabolic syndrome (MetS) has primarily been based on cross-sectional studies. This study prospectively examined the relationships between area-level socioeconomic position (SEP) and the incidence of MetS.MethodsA prospective cohort study design was employed involving 1,877 men and women aged 18+ living in metropolitan Adelaide, Australia, all free of MetS at baseline. Area-level SEP measures, derived from Census data, included proportion of residents completing a university education, and median household weekly income. MetS, defined according to International Diabetes Federation, was ascertained after an average of 3.6 years follow up. Associations between each area-level SEP measure and incident MetS were examined by Poisson regression Generalised Estimating Equations models. Interaction between area- and individual-level SEP variables was also tested.ResultsA total of 156 men (18.7{\%}) and 153 women (13.1{\%}) developed MetS. Each percentage increase in the proportion of residents with a university education corresponded to a 2{\%} lower risk of developing MetS (age and sex-adjusted incidence risk ratio (RR) = 0.98; 95{\%} confidence interval (CI) =0.97-0.99). This association persisted after adjustment for individual-level income, education, and health behaviours. There was no significant association between area-level income and incident MetS overall. For the high income participants, however, a one standard deviation increase in median household weekly income was associated with a 29{\%} higher risk of developing MetS (Adjusted RR = 1.29; 95{\%}CI = 1.04-1.60).ConclusionsWhile area-level education was independently and inversely associated with the risk of developing MetS, the association between area-level income and the MetS incidence was modified by individual-level income",
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Area-level socioeconomic characteristics and incidence of metabolic syndrome: A prospective cohort study. / Ngo, Anhduc; Paquet, Catherine; Howard, Natasha; COFFEE, Neil; Adams, Robert; Taylor, Anne; DANIEL, Mark.

In: BMC Public Health, Vol. 13, No. 1, 2013, p. 1-11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Area-level socioeconomic characteristics and incidence of metabolic syndrome: A prospective cohort study

AU - Ngo, Anhduc

AU - Paquet, Catherine

AU - Howard, Natasha

AU - COFFEE, Neil

AU - Adams, Robert

AU - Taylor, Anne

AU - DANIEL, Mark

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - BackgroundThe evidence linking socioeconomic environments and metabolic syndrome (MetS) has primarily been based on cross-sectional studies. This study prospectively examined the relationships between area-level socioeconomic position (SEP) and the incidence of MetS.MethodsA prospective cohort study design was employed involving 1,877 men and women aged 18+ living in metropolitan Adelaide, Australia, all free of MetS at baseline. Area-level SEP measures, derived from Census data, included proportion of residents completing a university education, and median household weekly income. MetS, defined according to International Diabetes Federation, was ascertained after an average of 3.6 years follow up. Associations between each area-level SEP measure and incident MetS were examined by Poisson regression Generalised Estimating Equations models. Interaction between area- and individual-level SEP variables was also tested.ResultsA total of 156 men (18.7%) and 153 women (13.1%) developed MetS. Each percentage increase in the proportion of residents with a university education corresponded to a 2% lower risk of developing MetS (age and sex-adjusted incidence risk ratio (RR) = 0.98; 95% confidence interval (CI) =0.97-0.99). This association persisted after adjustment for individual-level income, education, and health behaviours. There was no significant association between area-level income and incident MetS overall. For the high income participants, however, a one standard deviation increase in median household weekly income was associated with a 29% higher risk of developing MetS (Adjusted RR = 1.29; 95%CI = 1.04-1.60).ConclusionsWhile area-level education was independently and inversely associated with the risk of developing MetS, the association between area-level income and the MetS incidence was modified by individual-level income

AB - BackgroundThe evidence linking socioeconomic environments and metabolic syndrome (MetS) has primarily been based on cross-sectional studies. This study prospectively examined the relationships between area-level socioeconomic position (SEP) and the incidence of MetS.MethodsA prospective cohort study design was employed involving 1,877 men and women aged 18+ living in metropolitan Adelaide, Australia, all free of MetS at baseline. Area-level SEP measures, derived from Census data, included proportion of residents completing a university education, and median household weekly income. MetS, defined according to International Diabetes Federation, was ascertained after an average of 3.6 years follow up. Associations between each area-level SEP measure and incident MetS were examined by Poisson regression Generalised Estimating Equations models. Interaction between area- and individual-level SEP variables was also tested.ResultsA total of 156 men (18.7%) and 153 women (13.1%) developed MetS. Each percentage increase in the proportion of residents with a university education corresponded to a 2% lower risk of developing MetS (age and sex-adjusted incidence risk ratio (RR) = 0.98; 95% confidence interval (CI) =0.97-0.99). This association persisted after adjustment for individual-level income, education, and health behaviours. There was no significant association between area-level income and incident MetS overall. For the high income participants, however, a one standard deviation increase in median household weekly income was associated with a 29% higher risk of developing MetS (Adjusted RR = 1.29; 95%CI = 1.04-1.60).ConclusionsWhile area-level education was independently and inversely associated with the risk of developing MetS, the association between area-level income and the MetS incidence was modified by individual-level income

U2 - 10.1186/1471-2458-13-681

DO - 10.1186/1471-2458-13-681

M3 - Article

VL - 13

SP - 1

EP - 11

JO - BMC Public Health

JF - BMC Public Health

SN - 1471-2458

IS - 1

ER -