Assassination by pacemaker: Australia needs to do more to regulate internet-connected medical devices

Research output: Contribution to Newspaper/Magazine/BulletinArticle

Abstract

In the future, people are going to be just a little bit cyborg. We’ve accepted hearing aids, nicotine patches and spectacles, but implanted medical devices that are internet-connected present new safety challenges. Are Australian regulators keeping up?

A global recall of pacemakers has sparked new fears and splashy headlines about hacked medical devices. But the next 20 years of medicine will normalise the use of intelligent implants to control pain, provide data for diagnostic purposes and supplement ailing organs, which means we need proper security as well as access in case of emergency.
Original languageEnglish
Pages1-3
Number of pages3
Volume2017
Specialist publicationThe Conversation
PublisherThe Conversation Paperpress
Publication statusPublished - 7 Sep 2017

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