Assessing improved biomass stoves as an intervention for reducing indoor air pollution exposure in rural Kenya

Caroline Ochieng, Sotiris Vardoulakis, Cathryn Tonne

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Use of biomass fuels is a major source of indoor air pollution and health burden in developing countries. Improved biomass stoves have been suggested as an intervention for reducing exposure to indoor air pollutants, greenhouse gas emissions and deforestation. This crosssectional study aimed to assess if an improved stove design (rocket stove) reduces kitchen and personal concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO) in a rural population in Kenya. CO concentrations were monitored continuously for 48 hours in kitchens and at personal levels. Although the improved stoves were associated with lower 48-hour kitchen and personal CO levels, the difference with traditional three stone fires was not statistically significant. However, peak CO exposure during cooking was significantly reduced in the improved stove group. The measured CO concentrations, even with improved stove use, still fall above WHO 24-hour guidelines for indoor air quality and therefore remain a health concern.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication10th International Conference on Healthy Buildings 2012
Pages471-476
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes
Event10th International Conference on Healthy Buildings 2012 - Brisbane, QLD, Australia
Duration: 8 Jul 201212 Jul 2012

Publication series

Name10th International Conference on Healthy Buildings 2012
Volume1

Conference

Conference10th International Conference on Healthy Buildings 2012
Country/TerritoryAustralia
CityBrisbane, QLD
Period8/07/1212/07/12

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