Assessment and remediation practices in Australian Dietetics courses

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

Abstract

Traditionally, students’ competence to practice has been judged by professional supervisors during work placements, with 10% of students
deemed not to reach this standard during the allocated timeframe. This
research aims to measure the assessment and remediation practices
within Australian accredited dietetics placement programs. In August
2016, the placement co-ordinators for such courses (n=15) were
invited to participate in a pilot-tested purpose built 13-item mixedmethods web-based survey. Data were analysed descriptively, with
responses to open-ended questions sorted into response category
themes and counted. A response rate of 80% (12/15) was achieved,
with 509 students enrolled in the final year of these programs (mean
standard deviation = 42 13). For most courses (9/12; 75%) competent performance was assessed within discrete placement units. In all
instances academic staff made the final assessment of competence in
consultation with worksite supervisors. Remediation practices included:
additional placements of 2–4 weeks (7/12), re-enrolment within 2–12
months in placement units (8/12) or an exit pathway (7/12). Some universities reported moving towards a more programmatic approach that
placed greater onus on the student to demonstrate competence. The
implications for a ’failed’ placement can be substantial, with some student’s waiting 12 months to repeat a unit. The move towards a more
holistic approach for the assessment and remediation of professional
competence is appropriate given that workplace learning is non-linear,
dynamic and context dependent.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNutrition and Dietetics
Subtitle of host publicationDietitians Association of Australia 25th National Conference
PublisherNutrition and Dietetics
Pages14
Number of pages1
Volume75
Edition1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Publication series

NameDietitians Association of Australia

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Cite this

Shaaf, Z., BACON, R., & KELLETT, J. (2018). Assessment and remediation practices in Australian Dietetics courses. In Nutrition and Dietetics: Dietitians Association of Australia 25th National Conference (1 ed., Vol. 75, pp. 14). (Dietitians Association of Australia ). Nutrition and Dietetics. https://doi.org/10.1111/1747-0080.12426
Shaaf, Zahra ; BACON, Rachel ; KELLETT, Jane. / Assessment and remediation practices in Australian Dietetics courses. Nutrition and Dietetics: Dietitians Association of Australia 25th National Conference . Vol. 75 1. ed. Nutrition and Dietetics, 2018. pp. 14 (Dietitians Association of Australia ).
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Shaaf, Z, BACON, R & KELLETT, J 2018, Assessment and remediation practices in Australian Dietetics courses. in Nutrition and Dietetics: Dietitians Association of Australia 25th National Conference . 1 edn, vol. 75, Dietitians Association of Australia , Nutrition and Dietetics, pp. 14. https://doi.org/10.1111/1747-0080.12426

Assessment and remediation practices in Australian Dietetics courses. / Shaaf, Zahra; BACON, Rachel; KELLETT, Jane.

Nutrition and Dietetics: Dietitians Association of Australia 25th National Conference . Vol. 75 1. ed. Nutrition and Dietetics, 2018. p. 14 (Dietitians Association of Australia ).

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

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Shaaf Z, BACON R, KELLETT J. Assessment and remediation practices in Australian Dietetics courses. In Nutrition and Dietetics: Dietitians Association of Australia 25th National Conference . 1 ed. Vol. 75. Nutrition and Dietetics. 2018. p. 14. (Dietitians Association of Australia ). https://doi.org/10.1111/1747-0080.12426