Associations between perceived proximity to neighborhood resources, disability, and social participation among community-dwelling older adults

Results from the VoisiNuAge Study

Mélanie Levasseur, Lise Gauvin, Lucie Richard, Yan Kestens, Mark DANIEL, Hélène Payette

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine the associations between perceived proximity to neighborhood resources, disability, and social participation and the potential moderating effect of perceived proximity to neighborhood resources on the association between disability and social participation in community-dwelling older women and men. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Community. Participants: Older adults (296 women, 258 men). Interventions: Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures: Data for age, education, depressive symptoms, frequency of participation in community activities, perceived proximity to neighborhood resources (services, amenities), and functional autonomy in daily activities (disability) were collected by means of interviewer-administered questionnaire. Results: Greater perceived proximity to resources and lower level of disability were associated with greater social participation for both women (R(2)=.10; P<.001) and men (R(2)=.05; P<.01). The association between disability and social participation did not vary as a function of perceived proximity to neighborhood resources in women (no moderating effect; P=.15). However, in men, greater perceived proximity to neighborhood resources enhanced social participation (P=.01), but only in those with minor or no disability. Conclusions: Future studies should investigate why perceived proximity to services and amenities is associated with social participation in older men with minor or no disabilities and with women overall, but has no association in men with moderate disabilities.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1979-1986
Number of pages8
JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume92
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Social Participation
Independent Living
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Interviews
Depression
Education

Cite this

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title = "Associations between perceived proximity to neighborhood resources, disability, and social participation among community-dwelling older adults: Results from the VoisiNuAge Study",
abstract = "Objective: To examine the associations between perceived proximity to neighborhood resources, disability, and social participation and the potential moderating effect of perceived proximity to neighborhood resources on the association between disability and social participation in community-dwelling older women and men. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Community. Participants: Older adults (296 women, 258 men). Interventions: Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures: Data for age, education, depressive symptoms, frequency of participation in community activities, perceived proximity to neighborhood resources (services, amenities), and functional autonomy in daily activities (disability) were collected by means of interviewer-administered questionnaire. Results: Greater perceived proximity to resources and lower level of disability were associated with greater social participation for both women (R(2)=.10; P<.001) and men (R(2)=.05; P<.01). The association between disability and social participation did not vary as a function of perceived proximity to neighborhood resources in women (no moderating effect; P=.15). However, in men, greater perceived proximity to neighborhood resources enhanced social participation (P=.01), but only in those with minor or no disability. Conclusions: Future studies should investigate why perceived proximity to services and amenities is associated with social participation in older men with minor or no disabilities and with women overall, but has no association in men with moderate disabilities.",
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Associations between perceived proximity to neighborhood resources, disability, and social participation among community-dwelling older adults : Results from the VoisiNuAge Study. / Levasseur, Mélanie; Gauvin, Lise; Richard, Lucie; Kestens, Yan; DANIEL, Mark; Payette, Hélène.

In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vol. 92, No. 12, 2011, p. 1979-1986.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Richard, Lucie

AU - Kestens, Yan

AU - DANIEL, Mark

AU - Payette, Hélène

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AB - Objective: To examine the associations between perceived proximity to neighborhood resources, disability, and social participation and the potential moderating effect of perceived proximity to neighborhood resources on the association between disability and social participation in community-dwelling older women and men. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Community. Participants: Older adults (296 women, 258 men). Interventions: Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures: Data for age, education, depressive symptoms, frequency of participation in community activities, perceived proximity to neighborhood resources (services, amenities), and functional autonomy in daily activities (disability) were collected by means of interviewer-administered questionnaire. Results: Greater perceived proximity to resources and lower level of disability were associated with greater social participation for both women (R(2)=.10; P<.001) and men (R(2)=.05; P<.01). The association between disability and social participation did not vary as a function of perceived proximity to neighborhood resources in women (no moderating effect; P=.15). However, in men, greater perceived proximity to neighborhood resources enhanced social participation (P=.01), but only in those with minor or no disability. Conclusions: Future studies should investigate why perceived proximity to services and amenities is associated with social participation in older men with minor or no disabilities and with women overall, but has no association in men with moderate disabilities.

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