Attitudes and self-reported end-of-life care of Australian and New Zealand intensive care doctors in the context of organ donation after circulatory death

Y. Y. Lee, K. Ranse, W. Silvester, A. Mehta, F. M. P. Van Haren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The incidence of organ donation after circulatory death (DCD) in Australia and New Zealand (ANZ) has steadily increased in recent years. Intensive care doctors are vital to the implementation of DCD and healthcare professionals' attitudes to DCD can influence their participation. In order to determine ANZ intensive care doctors' attitudes to DCD, to explore if demographic characteristics influence attitude to DCD and to assess if attitude to DCD can predict palliative prescription rationale at the end of life of DCD donors, a cross-sectional online survey was distributed to ANZ intensive care doctors and responses collected between 29 April and 10 June 2016. Exploratory factor analysis was used to define various attributes of attitude to DCD. Results were subjected to comparative statistical analyses to examine the relation between demographic data and attitude to DCD. Multiple regression models were used to examine if attitude to DCD could predict intensive care doctors' palliative prescription rationales at the end of life of DCD donors. One hundred and sixty-one intensive care doctors responded to the survey with 69.4% having worked in intensive care for ten years or more. Respondents responded positively to the support of and perceived importance of DCD in helping those who would benefit from the donations (constructive attributes) (mean composite factor score = 3.84, standard deviation [SD] 0.83), they positively perceived that conducive and facilitative orchestration of DCD helps families cope (mean composite factor score = 3.94, SD 0.72) and that they would manage a DCD donor similar to any patient at the end of their life (mean score = 3.94, SD 0.72). Respondents responded negatively to having concerns that the circulatory death of potential DCD donors does not occur within the specified time frame (mean score = 2.28, SD 1.02). There was an association between organ donation professional education courses, familiarity with national guidelines and positive attitudes to certain attributes of attitude to DCD. Regression models demonstrated the attitude to DCD may predict intensive care doctors' palliative medication prescription rationales at the end of life of the DCD donor. Intensive care doctors in ANZ adopt a morally neutral attitude to DCD where they recognise the importance of organ donation, and support and conduct DCD as a part of good end-of-life care.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)488-497
Number of pages10
JournalAnaesthesia and Intensive Care
Volume46
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2018

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Attitudes and self-reported end-of-life care of Australian and New Zealand intensive care doctors in the context of organ donation after circulatory death'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this