Australasian emergency nurses' willingness to attend work in a disaster: A survey

Paul Arbon, Jamie RANSE, Lynette Cusack, Julie Considine, Ramon Z. Shaban, Richard J. Woodman, Laura Bahnisch, Mayumi Kako, Karen Hammad, Belinda Mitchell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background
The type of disaster, individual demographic factors, family factors and workplace factors, have been identified in the international, multidisciplinary literature as factors that influence a person's willingness to attend and assist in their workplace during a disaster. However, it is unknown if these factors are applicable to Australasian emergency nurses.

Aim
The research aims to determine the extent to which Australasian emergency nurses are willing to attend their workplace in a disaster.

Method
This research was exploratory and descriptive study design, using online and paper based surveys as a means of data collection. Australasian emergency nurses from two Australasian emergency nursing colleges and four Australian hospitals were recruited to participate. Data analysis was conducted using both descriptive and inferential statistics.

Results
In total, 451 Australasian emergency nurses participated in this research. Participants were more willing to attend their workplace during a conventional disaster (p ≤ 0.001), if they worked full-time (p = 0.01), had received formal education pertaining to disasters (p ≤ 0.001), had a family disaster plan (p = 0.008), did not have children (p = 0.001) and worked in an environment in which they perceived their colleagues, managers and organisation to be prepared.

Conclusions
The factors that influenced Australasian emergency nurses to attend their workplace in a disaster were similar to that described in the international multidisciplinary literature. Of particular note, improving disaster knowledge and skills, having a family disaster plan and improving the perceptions of the nurses’ workplace preparedness can enhance the nurses’ willingness to assist in a disaster
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)52-57
Number of pages6
JournalAustralasian Emergency Nursing Journal
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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Disasters
Emergencies
Nurses
Workplace
Emergency Nursing
Research
Surveys and Questionnaires
Demography
Organizations
Education

Cite this

Arbon, P., RANSE, J., Cusack, L., Considine, J., Shaban, R. Z., Woodman, R. J., ... Mitchell, B. (2013). Australasian emergency nurses' willingness to attend work in a disaster: A survey. Australasian Emergency Nursing Journal, 16(2), 52-57. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aenj.2013.05.003
Arbon, Paul ; RANSE, Jamie ; Cusack, Lynette ; Considine, Julie ; Shaban, Ramon Z. ; Woodman, Richard J. ; Bahnisch, Laura ; Kako, Mayumi ; Hammad, Karen ; Mitchell, Belinda. / Australasian emergency nurses' willingness to attend work in a disaster: A survey. In: Australasian Emergency Nursing Journal. 2013 ; Vol. 16, No. 2. pp. 52-57.
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Arbon, P, RANSE, J, Cusack, L, Considine, J, Shaban, RZ, Woodman, RJ, Bahnisch, L, Kako, M, Hammad, K & Mitchell, B 2013, 'Australasian emergency nurses' willingness to attend work in a disaster: A survey', Australasian Emergency Nursing Journal, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 52-57. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aenj.2013.05.003

Australasian emergency nurses' willingness to attend work in a disaster: A survey. / Arbon, Paul; RANSE, Jamie; Cusack, Lynette; Considine, Julie; Shaban, Ramon Z.; Woodman, Richard J.; Bahnisch, Laura; Kako, Mayumi; Hammad, Karen; Mitchell, Belinda.

In: Australasian Emergency Nursing Journal, Vol. 16, No. 2, 2013, p. 52-57.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Hammad, Karen

AU - Mitchell, Belinda

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N2 - BackgroundThe type of disaster, individual demographic factors, family factors and workplace factors, have been identified in the international, multidisciplinary literature as factors that influence a person's willingness to attend and assist in their workplace during a disaster. However, it is unknown if these factors are applicable to Australasian emergency nurses.AimThe research aims to determine the extent to which Australasian emergency nurses are willing to attend their workplace in a disaster.MethodThis research was exploratory and descriptive study design, using online and paper based surveys as a means of data collection. Australasian emergency nurses from two Australasian emergency nursing colleges and four Australian hospitals were recruited to participate. Data analysis was conducted using both descriptive and inferential statistics.ResultsIn total, 451 Australasian emergency nurses participated in this research. Participants were more willing to attend their workplace during a conventional disaster (p ≤ 0.001), if they worked full-time (p = 0.01), had received formal education pertaining to disasters (p ≤ 0.001), had a family disaster plan (p = 0.008), did not have children (p = 0.001) and worked in an environment in which they perceived their colleagues, managers and organisation to be prepared.ConclusionsThe factors that influenced Australasian emergency nurses to attend their workplace in a disaster were similar to that described in the international multidisciplinary literature. Of particular note, improving disaster knowledge and skills, having a family disaster plan and improving the perceptions of the nurses’ workplace preparedness can enhance the nurses’ willingness to assist in a disaster

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