Automating direct-to-PCR for disaster victim identification

J. Watherston, D. Bruce, J. Ward, M. E. Gahan, D. McNevin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Direct-to-PCR methodology adds samples directly to PCR tubes offering gains in efficiency and sensitivity. The approach has been applied to a variety of biological sources including blood, saliva, tissue, hair and nail. We added various preservative solutions to a range of biological samples to leech DNA into solution, whilst preserving at room temperature. Tubes containing ‘free DNA’ then followed automated workflows for amplification and capillary electrophoresis. Routine FASS-automated workflows (including DNA extraction and quantification) were compared with published direct-to-PCR methodology and automated amplification of an aliquot of preservative solution. Applying preservative solutions to ~30-year-old blood stains stored at room temperature resulted in recovery of a larger quantity of DNA and more alleles (using PowerPlex 21) when compared with routine automated typing. Trials were extended to blood, saliva, hair and nail, mimicking ante-mortem samples collected in a disaster victim identification effort. Despite slightly lower allelic recovery, the faster processing times, lower costs and storage potential offers advantages for the processing of ante-mortem samples.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)539-543
Number of pages5
JournalAustralian Journal of Forensic Sciences
Volume51
Issue numberSup 1
Early online date22 Jan 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Fingerprint

Disaster Victims
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Workflow
DNA
Nails
Saliva
Hair
Blood Stains
Leeches
Temperature
Capillary Electrophoresis
Alleles
Costs and Cost Analysis

Cite this

Watherston, J., Bruce, D., Ward, J., Gahan, M. E., & McNevin, D. (2019). Automating direct-to-PCR for disaster victim identification. Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences, 51(Sup 1), 539-543. https://doi.org/10.1080/00450618.2019.1569145
Watherston, J. ; Bruce, D. ; Ward, J. ; Gahan, M. E. ; McNevin, D. / Automating direct-to-PCR for disaster victim identification. In: Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences. 2019 ; Vol. 51, No. Sup 1. pp. 539-543.
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Watherston, J, Bruce, D, Ward, J, Gahan, ME & McNevin, D 2019, 'Automating direct-to-PCR for disaster victim identification', Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences, vol. 51, no. Sup 1, pp. 539-543. https://doi.org/10.1080/00450618.2019.1569145

Automating direct-to-PCR for disaster victim identification. / Watherston, J.; Bruce, D.; Ward, J.; Gahan, M. E.; McNevin, D.

In: Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences, Vol. 51, No. Sup 1, 2019, p. 539-543.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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