Barriers and Enablers to Successful Uptake of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Treatment for Obstructive Sleep Apnoea for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People

Cindy Woods, Kim Usher, L Kerr, J Ferns, G Maguire

    Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting Abstractpeer-review

    Abstract

    Background: This study is the first to engage Aboriginal Australian and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples (Indigenous Australians) to better understand their experience of treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA).

    Objective: To explore Indigenous Australians’ experiences of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment, enablers and barriers to CPAP therapy. Methods: A qualitative content analysis was employed. Data were collected by in-depth interviews with 12 Indigenous CPAP users.

    Results: Lack of knowledge and a sense of shame influence Indigenous health care seeking related to OSA. Support from family and friends is an important factor in influencing the uptake of CPAP therapy and/or persistence with the treatment.

    Conclusion: Raising awareness about the health risks of untreated OSA and the benefits of treatment will be an important first step for Indigenous Australians to recognise they have a medical condition and to seek treatment.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1-1
    Number of pages1
    JournalJournal of Sleep Disorders: Treatment and Care
    Volume5
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 21 Jun 2016

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Barriers and Enablers to Successful Uptake of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Treatment for Obstructive Sleep Apnoea for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this