Biodiversity conservation and ecologically sustainable development

J. J. Mott, P. B. Bridgewater

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Australia is one of 12 mega-diverse countries that together account for 75% of the total diversity of the planet. The Aboriginal people have interacted with the land for more than 60 000 years but the reality of modern Australia is that the landscapes are the result of large-scale alterations caused by the rapid application of European-style agricultural and pastoral regimes. This article examines the human impacts in Australia and argues that only by careful management of the whole of the country and taking special notice of the Australian context and species and communities can the biodiversity be sustained. The importance of establishing an adequate management infrastructure is emphasised. -L.Wright

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)284-287
    Number of pages4
    JournalSearch
    Volume23
    Issue number9
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1992

    Fingerprint

    biodiversity
    sustainable development
    conservation
    indigenous population
    anthropogenic effect
    planet
    infrastructure
    management
    regime
    community
    notice
    land

    Cite this

    Mott, J. J., & Bridgewater, P. B. (1992). Biodiversity conservation and ecologically sustainable development. Search, 23(9), 284-287.
    Mott, J. J. ; Bridgewater, P. B. / Biodiversity conservation and ecologically sustainable development. In: Search. 1992 ; Vol. 23, No. 9. pp. 284-287.
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    Biodiversity conservation and ecologically sustainable development. / Mott, J. J.; Bridgewater, P. B.

    In: Search, Vol. 23, No. 9, 01.01.1992, p. 284-287.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    Mott JJ, Bridgewater PB. Biodiversity conservation and ecologically sustainable development. Search. 1992 Jan 1;23(9):284-287.