Blood biomarkers as predictors of long-term mortality in COPD

Angelico Mendy, Erick Forno, Theophile Niyonsenga, Janvier Gasana

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Blood biomarkers are easily accessible and might reflect chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) activity. AIM: The aim of this study was to determine whether a panel of blood biomarkers [C-reactive protein (CRP), neutrophils, eosinophils, albumin and vitamin D] could predict mortality in COPD. METHODS: We analyzed data from 431 COPD participants to the 2007-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys who were followed for a median time of 36 months. COPD was defined as post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity ratio <0.70. Weibull survival analysis adjusted for covariates was performed to calculate the risk of mortality associated with the biomarkers, and C-statistics was used to assess their added predictive value.

RESULTS: During follow-up, 38 of the 431 participants died. Participants with high CRP, eosinophil count <2%, hypoalbuminemia and hypovitaminosis D had worse baseline FEV1 and subsequently higher mortality compared to controls. In adjusted analysis, increasing CRP [hazard ratio (HR): 4.45, 95% CI: 1.91-10.37] and neutrophil count (HR: 1.07, 95% CI: 1.03-1.11) as well as decreasing eosinophil count (HR: 7.03, 95% CI: 2.05-24.01) were associated with an increased risk of mortality. The addition of CRP with eosinophil and/or neutrophil count significantly improved a base model for the prediction of mortality which included age, gender, race/ethnicity, body mass index, smoking, poverty income ratio, asthma, diabetes, hypertension and history of stroke or myocardial infarction. CONCLUSION: High CRP and neutrophils as well as low eosinophils are predictive of poor COPD prognosis. They also add significant value to prediction models of mortality in COPD.

LanguageEnglish
Pages1-9
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Respiratory Journal
Volume12
Issue number5
Early online date11 Dec 2017
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2018
Externally publishedYes

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Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Eosinophils
C-Reactive Protein
Biomarkers
Mortality
Neutrophils
Forced Expiratory Volume
Hypoalbuminemia
Nutrition Surveys
Bronchodilator Agents
Vital Capacity
Poverty
Survival Analysis
Vitamin D
Albumins
Body Mass Index
Asthma
Smoking
Stroke
Myocardial Infarction

Cite this

Mendy, Angelico ; Forno, Erick ; Niyonsenga, Theophile ; Gasana, Janvier. / Blood biomarkers as predictors of long-term mortality in COPD. In: Clinical Respiratory Journal. 2018 ; Vol. 12, No. 5. pp. 1-9
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Blood biomarkers as predictors of long-term mortality in COPD. / Mendy, Angelico; Forno, Erick; Niyonsenga, Theophile; Gasana, Janvier.

In: Clinical Respiratory Journal, Vol. 12, No. 5, 05.2018, p. 1-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Blood biomarkers as predictors of long-term mortality in COPD

AU - Mendy,Angelico

AU - Forno,Erick

AU - Niyonsenga,Theophile

AU - Gasana,Janvier

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N2 - BACKGROUND: Blood biomarkers are easily accessible and might reflect chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) activity. AIM: The aim of this study was to determine whether a panel of blood biomarkers [C-reactive protein (CRP), neutrophils, eosinophils, albumin and vitamin D] could predict mortality in COPD. METHODS: We analyzed data from 431 COPD participants to the 2007-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys who were followed for a median time of 36 months. COPD was defined as post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity ratio <0.70. Weibull survival analysis adjusted for covariates was performed to calculate the risk of mortality associated with the biomarkers, and C-statistics was used to assess their added predictive value.RESULTS: During follow-up, 38 of the 431 participants died. Participants with high CRP, eosinophil count <2%, hypoalbuminemia and hypovitaminosis D had worse baseline FEV1 and subsequently higher mortality compared to controls. In adjusted analysis, increasing CRP [hazard ratio (HR): 4.45, 95% CI: 1.91-10.37] and neutrophil count (HR: 1.07, 95% CI: 1.03-1.11) as well as decreasing eosinophil count (HR: 7.03, 95% CI: 2.05-24.01) were associated with an increased risk of mortality. The addition of CRP with eosinophil and/or neutrophil count significantly improved a base model for the prediction of mortality which included age, gender, race/ethnicity, body mass index, smoking, poverty income ratio, asthma, diabetes, hypertension and history of stroke or myocardial infarction. CONCLUSION: High CRP and neutrophils as well as low eosinophils are predictive of poor COPD prognosis. They also add significant value to prediction models of mortality in COPD.

AB - BACKGROUND: Blood biomarkers are easily accessible and might reflect chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) activity. AIM: The aim of this study was to determine whether a panel of blood biomarkers [C-reactive protein (CRP), neutrophils, eosinophils, albumin and vitamin D] could predict mortality in COPD. METHODS: We analyzed data from 431 COPD participants to the 2007-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys who were followed for a median time of 36 months. COPD was defined as post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity ratio <0.70. Weibull survival analysis adjusted for covariates was performed to calculate the risk of mortality associated with the biomarkers, and C-statistics was used to assess their added predictive value.RESULTS: During follow-up, 38 of the 431 participants died. Participants with high CRP, eosinophil count <2%, hypoalbuminemia and hypovitaminosis D had worse baseline FEV1 and subsequently higher mortality compared to controls. In adjusted analysis, increasing CRP [hazard ratio (HR): 4.45, 95% CI: 1.91-10.37] and neutrophil count (HR: 1.07, 95% CI: 1.03-1.11) as well as decreasing eosinophil count (HR: 7.03, 95% CI: 2.05-24.01) were associated with an increased risk of mortality. The addition of CRP with eosinophil and/or neutrophil count significantly improved a base model for the prediction of mortality which included age, gender, race/ethnicity, body mass index, smoking, poverty income ratio, asthma, diabetes, hypertension and history of stroke or myocardial infarction. CONCLUSION: High CRP and neutrophils as well as low eosinophils are predictive of poor COPD prognosis. They also add significant value to prediction models of mortality in COPD.

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JO - Clinical Respiratory Journal

T2 - Clinical Respiratory Journal

JF - Clinical Respiratory Journal

SN - 1752-699X

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ER -