Business Cycles in Australia

Robert Ewing, John HAWKINS

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

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Abstract

Business cycles can be identified, with varying degrees of precision, for most of the past two centuries of Australia’s history. For the period covered by quarterly national accounts, there are clear ‘classical’ downturns in the early 1960s, mid 1970s, early 1980s and early 1990s. The current economic expansion is the longest in at least a century, but this does not in itself make a recession inevitable. Expansions are only ended by shocks or a buildup of imbalances.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 35th Australian Conference of Economists
Place of PublicationAustralia
Pages1-49
Number of pages49
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2006
Externally publishedYes
Event35th Australian Conference of Economists - Perth, Australia
Duration: 25 Sep 200627 Sep 2006

Conference

Conference35th Australian Conference of Economists
CountryAustralia
CityPerth
Period25/09/0627/09/06

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Business cycles
Recession
Imbalance
National accounts
Economics

Cite this

Ewing, R., & HAWKINS, J. (2006). Business Cycles in Australia. In Proceedings of the 35th Australian Conference of Economists (pp. 1-49). Australia .
Ewing, Robert ; HAWKINS, John. / Business Cycles in Australia. Proceedings of the 35th Australian Conference of Economists. Australia , 2006. pp. 1-49
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Ewing, R & HAWKINS, J 2006, Business Cycles in Australia. in Proceedings of the 35th Australian Conference of Economists. Australia , pp. 1-49, 35th Australian Conference of Economists, Perth, Australia, 25/09/06.

Business Cycles in Australia. / Ewing, Robert; HAWKINS, John.

Proceedings of the 35th Australian Conference of Economists. Australia , 2006. p. 1-49.

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

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Ewing R, HAWKINS J. Business Cycles in Australia. In Proceedings of the 35th Australian Conference of Economists. Australia . 2006. p. 1-49