Business reporting at the beginning of the 21st century: is it getting easier?

Jennifer Kitchener

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

Abstract

During 2001 a number of well-known companies began to make headlines as they battled serious financial problems and then collapsed. Yet very often the weaknesses that led to the demise of such household names as Ansett, Harris Scarfe and HIH were apparent to many in the business community long before
the companies were subjected to media scrutiny. This paper focuses on the reporting of HIH as part of a wider study of the Australian business press. It discusses the obstacles journalists face in monitoring 'blue chip' companies and whether the business culture that fostered the corporate collapses and boosterist reporting of the 1980s still prevails today.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the ANZCA 2002 Conference
Place of PublicationQueensland
PublisherBond University
Number of pages8
Publication statusPublished - 2002
EventThe ANZCA 2002 Conference - Queensland, Australia
Duration: 1 Jan 2002 → …

Conference

ConferenceThe ANZCA 2002 Conference
CountryAustralia
CityQueensland
Period1/01/02 → …

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Business reporting
Monitoring
Journalists
Household
Business culture

Cite this

Kitchener, J. (2002). Business reporting at the beginning of the 21st century: is it getting easier? In Proceedings of the ANZCA 2002 Conference Queensland: Bond University.
Kitchener, Jennifer. / Business reporting at the beginning of the 21st century: is it getting easier?. Proceedings of the ANZCA 2002 Conference. Queensland : Bond University, 2002.
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Kitchener, J 2002, Business reporting at the beginning of the 21st century: is it getting easier? in Proceedings of the ANZCA 2002 Conference. Bond University, Queensland, The ANZCA 2002 Conference, Queensland, Australia, 1/01/02.

Business reporting at the beginning of the 21st century: is it getting easier? / Kitchener, Jennifer.

Proceedings of the ANZCA 2002 Conference. Queensland : Bond University, 2002.

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

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Kitchener J. Business reporting at the beginning of the 21st century: is it getting easier? In Proceedings of the ANZCA 2002 Conference. Queensland: Bond University. 2002