Can the simulated experience of connecting through narratives and personal artefacts raise students’ perceptions of their preparedness to communicate with their patients about more than their illness?

Fellon Gaida, Jane Frost

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

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Abstract

Objective: Building therapeutic connections is at the core of quality nursing care. It is often difficult however, for neophyte nursing students to understand how meaningful connections with patients can be formed. Therapeutic connection and person-centred communication are multi-faceted constructs that require exploration and practice. Methods: In order to explore a new way of enhancing communication skills and increasing the preparedness of students to build therapeutic relationships, a novel learning experience was created. This experience centred around multi-modal simulation which incorporated 360 degree technology, digital platforms and interactive simulation using the Mask-Ed™ (KRS simulation) technique. The experience was offered to an entire cohort of students in their first year of a Baccalaureate nursing program. Evaluation data was collected via pre and post-test questionnaires. Results: A statistically significant improvement in student’s self-reported preparedness to build rapport and initiating conversation with patients was observed. 80% of students felt the intervention had assisted with their learning and would like to see it offered again in the future. Conclusion: Findings suggest that there is potential in combining interactive 360-degree technology and Mask-Ed™ simulation to augment the learning experience, increase student engagement and to create a safe space for students to explore learning.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalAustralian Journal of Clinical Education
Volume8
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2020

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