Characterizing the plasma metabolome during 14 days of live-high, train-low simulated altitude

A metabolomic approach

Nathan G. Lawler, Chris R. Abbiss, Joel P.A. Gummer, David I. Broadhurst, Andrew D. Govus, Timothy J. Fairchild, Kevin G. Thompson, Laura A. Garvican-Lewis, Christopher J. Gore, Garth L. Maker, Robert D. Trengove, Jeremiah J. Peiffer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of 14 days of normobaric hypoxic simulated altitude exposure at 3000 m on the human plasma metabolomic profile. For 14 days, 10 well-trained endurance runners (six men and four women; 29 ± 7 years of age) lived at 3000 m simulated altitude, accumulating 196.4 ± 25.6 h of hypoxic exposure, and trained at ∼600 m. Resting plasma samples were collected at baseline and on days 3 and 14 of altitude exposure and stored at −80◦C. Plasma samples were analysed using liquid chromatography–high-resolution mass spectrometry to construct a metabolite profile of altitude exposure. Mass spectrometry of plasma identified 36 metabolites, of which eight were statistically significant (false discovery rate probability 0.1) from baseline to either day 3 or day 14. Specifically, changes in plasma metabolites relating to amino acid metabolism (tyrosine and proline), glycolysis (adenosine) and purine metabolism (adenosine) were observed during altitude exposure. Principal component canonical variate analysis showed significant discrimination between group means (P < 0.05), with canonical variate 1 describing a non-linear recovery trajectory from baseline to day 3 and then back to baseline by day 14. Conversely, canonical variate 2 described a weaker non-recovery trajectory and increase from baseline to day 3, with a further increase from day 3 to 14. The present study demonstrates that metabolomics can be a useful tool to monitor metabolic changes associated with altitude exposure. Furthermore, it is apparent that altitude exposure alters multiple metabolic pathways, and the time course of these changes is different over 14 days of altitude exposure.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)81-92
Number of pages12
JournalExperimental Physiology
Volume104
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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Metabolomics
Metabolome
Adenosine
Glycolysis
Metabolic Networks and Pathways
Proline
Tyrosine
Spectrum Analysis
Amino Acids

Cite this

Lawler, N. G., Abbiss, C. R., Gummer, J. P. A., Broadhurst, D. I., Govus, A. D., Fairchild, T. J., ... Peiffer, J. J. (2019). Characterizing the plasma metabolome during 14 days of live-high, train-low simulated altitude: A metabolomic approach. Experimental Physiology, 104(1), 81-92. https://doi.org/10.1113/EP087159
Lawler, Nathan G. ; Abbiss, Chris R. ; Gummer, Joel P.A. ; Broadhurst, David I. ; Govus, Andrew D. ; Fairchild, Timothy J. ; Thompson, Kevin G. ; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A. ; Gore, Christopher J. ; Maker, Garth L. ; Trengove, Robert D. ; Peiffer, Jeremiah J. / Characterizing the plasma metabolome during 14 days of live-high, train-low simulated altitude : A metabolomic approach. In: Experimental Physiology. 2019 ; Vol. 104, No. 1. pp. 81-92.
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abstract = "The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of 14 days of normobaric hypoxic simulated altitude exposure at 3000 m on the human plasma metabolomic profile. For 14 days, 10 well-trained endurance runners (six men and four women; 29 ± 7 years of age) lived at 3000 m simulated altitude, accumulating 196.4 ± 25.6 h of hypoxic exposure, and trained at ∼600 m. Resting plasma samples were collected at baseline and on days 3 and 14 of altitude exposure and stored at −80◦C. Plasma samples were analysed using liquid chromatography–high-resolution mass spectrometry to construct a metabolite profile of altitude exposure. Mass spectrometry of plasma identified 36 metabolites, of which eight were statistically significant (false discovery rate probability 0.1) from baseline to either day 3 or day 14. Specifically, changes in plasma metabolites relating to amino acid metabolism (tyrosine and proline), glycolysis (adenosine) and purine metabolism (adenosine) were observed during altitude exposure. Principal component canonical variate analysis showed significant discrimination between group means (P < 0.05), with canonical variate 1 describing a non-linear recovery trajectory from baseline to day 3 and then back to baseline by day 14. Conversely, canonical variate 2 described a weaker non-recovery trajectory and increase from baseline to day 3, with a further increase from day 3 to 14. The present study demonstrates that metabolomics can be a useful tool to monitor metabolic changes associated with altitude exposure. Furthermore, it is apparent that altitude exposure alters multiple metabolic pathways, and the time course of these changes is different over 14 days of altitude exposure.",
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Lawler, NG, Abbiss, CR, Gummer, JPA, Broadhurst, DI, Govus, AD, Fairchild, TJ, Thompson, KG, Garvican-Lewis, LA, Gore, CJ, Maker, GL, Trengove, RD & Peiffer, JJ 2019, 'Characterizing the plasma metabolome during 14 days of live-high, train-low simulated altitude: A metabolomic approach', Experimental Physiology, vol. 104, no. 1, pp. 81-92. https://doi.org/10.1113/EP087159

Characterizing the plasma metabolome during 14 days of live-high, train-low simulated altitude : A metabolomic approach. / Lawler, Nathan G.; Abbiss, Chris R.; Gummer, Joel P.A.; Broadhurst, David I.; Govus, Andrew D.; Fairchild, Timothy J.; Thompson, Kevin G.; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A.; Gore, Christopher J.; Maker, Garth L.; Trengove, Robert D.; Peiffer, Jeremiah J.

In: Experimental Physiology, Vol. 104, No. 1, 2019, p. 81-92.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Characterizing the plasma metabolome during 14 days of live-high, train-low simulated altitude

T2 - A metabolomic approach

AU - Lawler, Nathan G.

AU - Abbiss, Chris R.

AU - Gummer, Joel P.A.

AU - Broadhurst, David I.

AU - Govus, Andrew D.

AU - Fairchild, Timothy J.

AU - Thompson, Kevin G.

AU - Garvican-Lewis, Laura A.

AU - Gore, Christopher J.

AU - Maker, Garth L.

AU - Trengove, Robert D.

AU - Peiffer, Jeremiah J.

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of 14 days of normobaric hypoxic simulated altitude exposure at 3000 m on the human plasma metabolomic profile. For 14 days, 10 well-trained endurance runners (six men and four women; 29 ± 7 years of age) lived at 3000 m simulated altitude, accumulating 196.4 ± 25.6 h of hypoxic exposure, and trained at ∼600 m. Resting plasma samples were collected at baseline and on days 3 and 14 of altitude exposure and stored at −80◦C. Plasma samples were analysed using liquid chromatography–high-resolution mass spectrometry to construct a metabolite profile of altitude exposure. Mass spectrometry of plasma identified 36 metabolites, of which eight were statistically significant (false discovery rate probability 0.1) from baseline to either day 3 or day 14. Specifically, changes in plasma metabolites relating to amino acid metabolism (tyrosine and proline), glycolysis (adenosine) and purine metabolism (adenosine) were observed during altitude exposure. Principal component canonical variate analysis showed significant discrimination between group means (P < 0.05), with canonical variate 1 describing a non-linear recovery trajectory from baseline to day 3 and then back to baseline by day 14. Conversely, canonical variate 2 described a weaker non-recovery trajectory and increase from baseline to day 3, with a further increase from day 3 to 14. The present study demonstrates that metabolomics can be a useful tool to monitor metabolic changes associated with altitude exposure. Furthermore, it is apparent that altitude exposure alters multiple metabolic pathways, and the time course of these changes is different over 14 days of altitude exposure.

AB - The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of 14 days of normobaric hypoxic simulated altitude exposure at 3000 m on the human plasma metabolomic profile. For 14 days, 10 well-trained endurance runners (six men and four women; 29 ± 7 years of age) lived at 3000 m simulated altitude, accumulating 196.4 ± 25.6 h of hypoxic exposure, and trained at ∼600 m. Resting plasma samples were collected at baseline and on days 3 and 14 of altitude exposure and stored at −80◦C. Plasma samples were analysed using liquid chromatography–high-resolution mass spectrometry to construct a metabolite profile of altitude exposure. Mass spectrometry of plasma identified 36 metabolites, of which eight were statistically significant (false discovery rate probability 0.1) from baseline to either day 3 or day 14. Specifically, changes in plasma metabolites relating to amino acid metabolism (tyrosine and proline), glycolysis (adenosine) and purine metabolism (adenosine) were observed during altitude exposure. Principal component canonical variate analysis showed significant discrimination between group means (P < 0.05), with canonical variate 1 describing a non-linear recovery trajectory from baseline to day 3 and then back to baseline by day 14. Conversely, canonical variate 2 described a weaker non-recovery trajectory and increase from baseline to day 3, with a further increase from day 3 to 14. The present study demonstrates that metabolomics can be a useful tool to monitor metabolic changes associated with altitude exposure. Furthermore, it is apparent that altitude exposure alters multiple metabolic pathways, and the time course of these changes is different over 14 days of altitude exposure.

KW - altitude

KW - altitude training

KW - energy

KW - hypoxia

KW - metabolites

KW - metabolomics

KW - profiling

KW - purines

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DO - 10.1113/EP087159

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