Charting the endonormative stabilization of Singapore English

Siew TAN

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of nativized multi-word verbal combinations (MVCs) such as discuss about, emphasize on and raise up is a characteristic of Singapore English (SgE) that has attracted much criticism from proponents of the standard language ideology in Singapore. In spite of this, these features have continued to prevail in SgE. Using a corpus-based approach, the present study demonstrates that nativized MVCs are relatively widespread, occurring in all six registers represented in the Singapore component of the International Corpus of English (ICE-SIN), and even in the most formal register of printed texts. Although not as common as their standard single-word variants (e.g., discuss, emphasize and raise) and dispreferred in careful language use, data from ICE-SIN show that these features occur in stable syntactic environments, and are assigned specific grammatical functions and structural characteristics that clearly define them. The fact that they can be found even in the most formal of text categories, such as parliamentary debates, legal cross-examinations, legal presentations, broadcast news, examination scripts and academic writing, suggests a need for the reevaluation of links between adherence to native-speaker norms, and user and uses variables (e.g., education level and social class of the speaker, and formality of the domain). Further, it suggests that these features have been institutionalized in SgE, or in Winford’s (2003) terminology, ‘conventionalized as part of the communal grammar’ of the language (p. 236). This chapter argues that they are structural and distributional manifestations of the stabilization of nativized MVCs in SgE.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCommunicating with Asia
Subtitle of host publicationThe Future of English as a Global Language
EditorsGerhard Leitner, Azirah Hashim, Hans-Georg Wolf
Place of PublicationCambridge, UK
PublisherCambridge University Press
Chapter5
Pages69-84
Number of pages16
EditionFirst
ISBN (Electronic)9781107477186
ISBN (Print)9781107062610
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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stabilization
Singapore
parliamentary debate
standard language
examination
language
broadcast
social class
technical language
Singapore English
Stabilization
grammar
news
criticism
ideology
education

Cite this

TAN, S. (2016). Charting the endonormative stabilization of Singapore English. In G. Leitner, A. Hashim, & H-G. Wolf (Eds.), Communicating with Asia: The Future of English as a Global Language (First ed., pp. 69-84). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781107477186.006
TAN, Siew. / Charting the endonormative stabilization of Singapore English. Communicating with Asia: The Future of English as a Global Language. editor / Gerhard Leitner ; Azirah Hashim ; Hans-Georg Wolf. First. ed. Cambridge, UK : Cambridge University Press, 2016. pp. 69-84
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TAN, S 2016, Charting the endonormative stabilization of Singapore English. in G Leitner, A Hashim & H-G Wolf (eds), Communicating with Asia: The Future of English as a Global Language. First edn, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, pp. 69-84. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781107477186.006

Charting the endonormative stabilization of Singapore English. / TAN, Siew.

Communicating with Asia: The Future of English as a Global Language. ed. / Gerhard Leitner; Azirah Hashim; Hans-Georg Wolf. First. ed. Cambridge, UK : Cambridge University Press, 2016. p. 69-84.

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookChapter

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AB - The use of nativized multi-word verbal combinations (MVCs) such as discuss about, emphasize on and raise up is a characteristic of Singapore English (SgE) that has attracted much criticism from proponents of the standard language ideology in Singapore. In spite of this, these features have continued to prevail in SgE. Using a corpus-based approach, the present study demonstrates that nativized MVCs are relatively widespread, occurring in all six registers represented in the Singapore component of the International Corpus of English (ICE-SIN), and even in the most formal register of printed texts. Although not as common as their standard single-word variants (e.g., discuss, emphasize and raise) and dispreferred in careful language use, data from ICE-SIN show that these features occur in stable syntactic environments, and are assigned specific grammatical functions and structural characteristics that clearly define them. The fact that they can be found even in the most formal of text categories, such as parliamentary debates, legal cross-examinations, legal presentations, broadcast news, examination scripts and academic writing, suggests a need for the reevaluation of links between adherence to native-speaker norms, and user and uses variables (e.g., education level and social class of the speaker, and formality of the domain). Further, it suggests that these features have been institutionalized in SgE, or in Winford’s (2003) terminology, ‘conventionalized as part of the communal grammar’ of the language (p. 236). This chapter argues that they are structural and distributional manifestations of the stabilization of nativized MVCs in SgE.

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BT - Communicating with Asia

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PB - Cambridge University Press

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TAN S. Charting the endonormative stabilization of Singapore English. In Leitner G, Hashim A, Wolf H-G, editors, Communicating with Asia: The Future of English as a Global Language. First ed. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. 2016. p. 69-84 https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781107477186.006