Childbirth confidence

Validating the childbirth self-efficacy inventory (CBSEI) in an Australian sample

Jane Drummond, Debra Rickwood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the reliability and validity of the Childbirth Self-Efficacy Inventory (CBSEI) (Lowe 1993) in a sample of 100 Australian women. Consistent with US data, the measure was shown to have high internal consistency. Validity of the instrument was determined by applying self-efficacy theory (Bandura 1982), which predicts that parity should have the largest effect on childbirth self-efficacy, followed by knowledge, then support and finally anxiety. Results revealed that having a prior good birth experience and knowledge about childbirth had significant effects on childbirth self-efficacy. A factor analysis was performed to determine whether the original factor structure of this instrument held for Australian women. While outcome expectancies and self-efficacy expectancies emerged as distinct factors, the results showed that Australian women did not differentiate between active and second-stage labour. Rather than the two stages of labour emerging as dimensions of the CBSEI, two externally focused coping strategies were revealed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)613-622
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Advanced Nursing
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1997

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Self Efficacy
Parturition
Equipment and Supplies
Second Labor Stage
Parity
Reproducibility of Results
Statistical Factor Analysis
Anxiety

Cite this

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Childbirth confidence : Validating the childbirth self-efficacy inventory (CBSEI) in an Australian sample. / Drummond, Jane; Rickwood, Debra.

In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, Vol. 26, No. 3, 1997, p. 613-622.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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