Children's longitudinal bodyweight in Australia: Influence of migrant mothers' long-term residency, attachment to, and level of childhood overweight in country-of-birth

Susan Hartono, Tom Cochrane, Theo Niyonsenga, Yohannes Kinfu

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Immigration creates opportunities and imposes constraints associated with acculturation. We used the Australian national longitudinal survey of children aged 2 to 17 to evaluate the influence of mothers' long-term residency in Australia, mothers' attachment to country-of-birth, and macro indicators of childhood overweight environment at mothers' country-of-birth on children's longitudinal bodyweight. Both mothers' long-term exposure to the Australian environment and attachment to country-of-birth were associated with increased children's bodyweight z-scores. The childhood overweight environment in mothers' country-of-birth continued to influence their children's bodyweight after immigration. A better understanding of factors related to mothers' migration and children's bodyweight status is necessary to identify risk factors and migrant sub-groups needing extra support.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number102791
    Pages (from-to)1-9
    Number of pages9
    JournalHealth and Place
    Volume75
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - May 2022

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