Children’s transport built environments: A mixed methods study of associations between perceived and objective measures and relationships with parent licence for independent mobility in Auckland, New Zealand

Melody Smith, Rebecca Amann, Alana Cavadino, Deborah Raphael, Robin Kearns, Roger Mackett, Lisa Mackay, Penelope Carroll, Euan Forsyth, Suzanne Mavoa, Jinfeng Zhao, Erika Ikeda, Karen Witten

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Children’s independent mobility is declining internationally. Parents are the gatekeepers of children’s independent mobility. This mixed methods study investigates whether parent perceptions of the neighbourhood environment alignwith objectivemeasures of the neighbourhood built environment, and how perceived and objectivemeasures relate to parental licence for children’s independentmobility. Parents participating in the Neighbourhood for Active Kids study (n = 940) answered an open-ended question about what would make their neighbourhoods better for their child’s independent mobility, and reported household and child demographics. Objective measures of the neighbourhood built environment were generated using geographic information systems. Content analysis was used to classify and group parent-reported changes required to improve their neigbourhood. Parent-reported needs were then compared with objective neighbourhood built environment measures. Linear mixed modelling examined associations between parental licence for independent mobility and (1) parent neighbourhood perceptions; and (2) objectively assessed neighbourhood built environment features. Parents identified the need for safer traffic environments. No significant differences in parent reported needs were found by objectively assessed characteristics. Differences in odds of reporting needs were observed for a range of socio-demographic characteristics. Parental licence for independent mobility was only associated with a need for safer places to cycle (positive) and objectively assessed cycling infrastructure (negative) in adjusted models. Overall, the study findings indicate the importance of safer traffic environments for children’s independent mobility.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1361
Pages (from-to)1-22
Number of pages22
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume16
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Apr 2019
Externally publishedYes

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