Civil Society and Cyber Society

The role of the Internet in community associations and democratic politics

Michael JENSEN, James Danziger, Alladi Venkatesh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

69 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A healthy civil society has long been held as vital to a healthy democracy and there is interest in whether the Internet affects this linkage. This paper explores the relationships between offline and online modes of associational life and also analyzes offline and online interactions with local governments in the US context. Based on our empirical analyses of 1,203 respondents, we show that online participation is not simply an extension of offline participation, but can be distinguished in important ways. First, we find that political and community-oriented engagements cluster separately from more private-regarding engagements. Second, participants of online democratic engagement are not characterized by the SES markers associated with offline democratic engagement who are older, have higher incomes, and have lived in the community longer. Finally, we find significant links between democratic engagement with the political system and involvement with political associations (but not social and community-oriented associations).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)39-50
Number of pages12
JournalThe Information Society
Volume23
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes

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civil society
Internet
politics
community
participation
political system
democracy
income
interaction
Society
Civil society
World Wide Web
Participation

Cite this

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Civil Society and Cyber Society : The role of the Internet in community associations and democratic politics. / JENSEN, Michael; Danziger, James; Venkatesh, Alladi .

In: The Information Society, Vol. 23, No. 1, 2007, p. 39-50.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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