Climate change, food security and population health in the Anthropocene

Colin BUTLER, Ro MCFARLANE

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookEntry for encyclopedia/dictionary

Abstract

Global environmental change, including an increasingly profound and disturnbing alteration to the climate, is accelerating, as the Anthropocene progresses (McMichael et al., 2915). These changes are part of a syndrome, a systemic, related cluster of environmental changes, including biodiversity loss, ocean acidification, fertile soil loss, freshwater depletion, and contamination (including of aquifers), compounded by disruption to global elemental cycles, including nitrogen and phosphorus. A single species, humans, is changing the planet's "operating system." Some of these ecological changes might be substituted or mimicked artificially, but it is most unlikely this can be done on a global scale, in the time needed.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEncyclopedia of the Anthropocene
EditorsDominick Dellasala, Michael Goldstein
Place of PublicationOxford, United Kingdom
PublisherElsevier
Pages453-459
Number of pages7
ISBN (Electronic)9780128135761
ISBN (Print)9780128096659
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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food security
environmental change
phosphorus cycle
climate change
nitrogen cycle
planet
aquifer
biodiversity
climate
soil
health
loss
Anthropocene
contamination
ocean acidification

Cite this

BUTLER, C., & MCFARLANE, R. (2018). Climate change, food security and population health in the Anthropocene. In D. Dellasala, & M. Goldstein (Eds.), Encyclopedia of the Anthropocene (pp. 453-459). Oxford, United Kingdom: Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-809665-9.09745-7
BUTLER, Colin ; MCFARLANE, Ro. / Climate change, food security and population health in the Anthropocene. Encyclopedia of the Anthropocene . editor / Dominick Dellasala ; Michael Goldstein. Oxford, United Kingdom : Elsevier, 2018. pp. 453-459
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BUTLER, C & MCFARLANE, R 2018, Climate change, food security and population health in the Anthropocene. in D Dellasala & M Goldstein (eds), Encyclopedia of the Anthropocene . Elsevier, Oxford, United Kingdom, pp. 453-459. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-809665-9.09745-7

Climate change, food security and population health in the Anthropocene. / BUTLER, Colin; MCFARLANE, Ro.

Encyclopedia of the Anthropocene . ed. / Dominick Dellasala; Michael Goldstein. Oxford, United Kingdom : Elsevier, 2018. p. 453-459.

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookEntry for encyclopedia/dictionary

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BUTLER C, MCFARLANE R. Climate change, food security and population health in the Anthropocene. In Dellasala D, Goldstein M, editors, Encyclopedia of the Anthropocene . Oxford, United Kingdom: Elsevier. 2018. p. 453-459 https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-809665-9.09745-7