Cold-water immersion and contrast water therapy: No improvement of short-term recovery after resistance training

Christos K. Argus, James R. Broatch, Aaron C. Petersen, Remco Polman, David J. Bishop, Shona Halson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: An athlete’s ability to recover quickly is important when there is limited time between training and competition. As such, recovery strategies are commonly used to expedite the recovery process. Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of both cold-water immersion (CWI) and contrast water therapy (CWT) compared with control on short-term recovery (<4 h) after a single full-body resistance-training session. Methods: Thirteen men (age 26 ± 5 y, weight 79 ± 7 kg, height 177 ± 5 cm) were assessed for perceptual (fatigue and soreness) and performance measures (maximal voluntary isometric contraction [MVC] of the knee extensors, weighted and unweighted countermovement jumps) before and immediately after the training session. Subjects then completed 1 of three 14-min recovery strategies (CWI, CWT, or passive sitting [CON]), with the perceptual and performance measures reassessed immediately, 2 h, and 4 h postrecovery. Results: Peak torque during MVC and jump performance were significantly decreased (P < .05) after the resistance-training session and remained depressed for at least 4 h postrecovery in all conditions. Neither CWI nor CWT had any effect on perceptual or performance measures over the 4-h recovery period. Conclusions: CWI and CWT did not improve short-term (<4-h) recovery after a conventional resistance-training session.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)886-892
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
Volume12
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2017

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