Comparing Two Methods of Reweighting a Survey File to Small Area Data

Robert TANTON, Paul Williamson, Ann HARDING

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    One method of calculating small area estimates using survey data involves deriving new weights for each respondent in the survey. These new weights are derived so that the survey data sums to some known totals for a small area (from either a Census or administrative data). There are different methods for calculating these weights, and this paper analyses the results from two different methods - a generalised regression method and combinatorial optimisation. The weights derived from each method are compared, and advantages and disadvantages of each method are assessed. Estimates of housing stress at a Statistical Local Area in Australia from each method are then calculated, and these estimates are then validated against a third reliable source, Australian Census data from 2001.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)76-99
    Number of pages24
    JournalInternational Journal of Microsimulation
    Volume7
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

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    Combinatorial optimization
    Census
    Survey Data
    Estimate
    Combinatorial Optimization
    Regression

    Cite this

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    abstract = "One method of calculating small area estimates using survey data involves deriving new weights for each respondent in the survey. These new weights are derived so that the survey data sums to some known totals for a small area (from either a Census or administrative data). There are different methods for calculating these weights, and this paper analyses the results from two different methods - a generalised regression method and combinatorial optimisation. The weights derived from each method are compared, and advantages and disadvantages of each method are assessed. Estimates of housing stress at a Statistical Local Area in Australia from each method are then calculated, and these estimates are then validated against a third reliable source, Australian Census data from 2001.",
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    Comparing Two Methods of Reweighting a Survey File to Small Area Data. / TANTON, Robert; Williamson, Paul; HARDING, Ann.

    In: International Journal of Microsimulation, Vol. 7, No. 1, 2014, p. 76-99.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

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    AU - TANTON, Robert

    AU - Williamson, Paul

    AU - HARDING, Ann

    PY - 2014

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    N2 - One method of calculating small area estimates using survey data involves deriving new weights for each respondent in the survey. These new weights are derived so that the survey data sums to some known totals for a small area (from either a Census or administrative data). There are different methods for calculating these weights, and this paper analyses the results from two different methods - a generalised regression method and combinatorial optimisation. The weights derived from each method are compared, and advantages and disadvantages of each method are assessed. Estimates of housing stress at a Statistical Local Area in Australia from each method are then calculated, and these estimates are then validated against a third reliable source, Australian Census data from 2001.

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    KW - generalised regression

    KW - spatial microsimulation

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    JO - International Journal of Microsimulation

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