Comparison of Body Composition Assessment Methods in Professional Urban Firefighters

Disa J Smee, Anthony Walker, Ben Rattray, Julie A Cooke, Ben G Serpell, Kate L Pumpa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Given the importance of body composition in maintaining optimal physical and functional capacities, the use of appropriate, field-based assessment tools should be a priority to assist in maintaining the occupational safety of firefighters and the community. For ease, body mass index has often been used to assess these changes. However, it is limited in its accuracy. The purposes of this study were twofold: (a) to compare the validity of different measures of body composition against dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in urban firefighters and (b) to assess these measures in their ability to provide meaningful interpretation of criteria-driven categories of adiposity. A total of 64 male firefighters (age = 44.0 ± 9.5 years) underwent full anthropometric profiling (predictor equations used to determine body fat percentage [BF%]), bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), and DXA assessments. Participants' body mass index was calculated, and BF% and lean mass were determined along with criteria-driven categorizations of adiposity. Anthropometric (skinfolds) predictor equations (e.g., mean bias = −4.4% for BF%) were typically closer to DXA measures, compared with BIA (9.4% for BF%). However, when determining categories of criteria-driven adiposity, BIA (42.9% overweight or obese) provided closer estimates to the DXA-determined distribution (44.6%) than anthropometric-based measures (up to 40%). Body mass index appears an inappropriate measure for accurately determining categories of adiposity with 64.1% classified as overweight or obese. Given the logistical constraints of anthropometric profiling, and the closeness of BIA to DXA in adiposity categories, BIA may be a suitable alternative to DXA for assessing body composition in professional urban firefighters.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)282-288
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Sport Nutrition
Volume29
Issue number3
Early online date10 Jul 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2019

Fingerprint

Firefighters
Photon Absorptiometry
Body Composition
Adiposity
Electric Impedance
Adipose Tissue
Body Mass Index
Occupational Health

Cite this

@article{4b77769fe2a54db7b0c2d63212240d5c,
title = "Comparison of Body Composition Assessment Methods in Professional Urban Firefighters",
abstract = "Given the importance of body composition in maintaining optimal physical and functional capacities, the use of appropriate, field-based assessment tools should be a priority to assist in maintaining the occupational safety of firefighters and the community. For ease, body mass index has often been used to assess these changes. However, it is limited in its accuracy. The purposes of this study were twofold: (a) to compare the validity of different measures of body composition against dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in urban firefighters and (b) to assess these measures in their ability to provide meaningful interpretation of criteria-driven categories of adiposity. A total of 64 male firefighters (age = 44.0 ± 9.5 years) underwent full anthropometric profiling (predictor equations used to determine body fat percentage [BF{\%}]), bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), and DXA assessments. Participants' body mass index was calculated, and BF{\%} and lean mass were determined along with criteria-driven categorizations of adiposity. Anthropometric (skinfolds) predictor equations (e.g., mean bias = −4.4{\%} for BF{\%}) were typically closer to DXA measures, compared with BIA (9.4{\%} for BF{\%}). However, when determining categories of criteria-driven adiposity, BIA (42.9{\%} overweight or obese) provided closer estimates to the DXA-determined distribution (44.6{\%}) than anthropometric-based measures (up to 40{\%}). Body mass index appears an inappropriate measure for accurately determining categories of adiposity with 64.1{\%} classified as overweight or obese. Given the logistical constraints of anthropometric profiling, and the closeness of BIA to DXA in adiposity categories, BIA may be a suitable alternative to DXA for assessing body composition in professional urban firefighters.",
keywords = "Anthropometry, Body Fat, body mass index, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, emergency services, Body mass index, Body fat, Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, Emergency services, Body Composition, Body Mass Index, Firefighters, Humans, Middle Aged, Male, Electric Impedance, Absorptiometry, Photon, Adiposity, Anthropometry/methods, Adult, Skinfold Thickness, anthropometry, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, body fat",
author = "Smee, {Disa J} and Anthony Walker and Ben Rattray and Cooke, {Julie A} and Serpell, {Ben G} and Pumpa, {Kate L}",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1123/ijsnem.2018-0040",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "282--288",
journal = "International Journal of Sport Nutrition",
issn = "1526-484X",
publisher = "Human Kinetics Publishers Inc.",
number = "3",

}

Comparison of Body Composition Assessment Methods in Professional Urban Firefighters. / Smee, Disa J; Walker, Anthony; Rattray, Ben; Cooke, Julie A; Serpell, Ben G; Pumpa, Kate L.

In: International Journal of Sport Nutrition, Vol. 29, No. 3, 05.2019, p. 282-288.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparison of Body Composition Assessment Methods in Professional Urban Firefighters

AU - Smee, Disa J

AU - Walker, Anthony

AU - Rattray, Ben

AU - Cooke, Julie A

AU - Serpell, Ben G

AU - Pumpa, Kate L

PY - 2019/5

Y1 - 2019/5

N2 - Given the importance of body composition in maintaining optimal physical and functional capacities, the use of appropriate, field-based assessment tools should be a priority to assist in maintaining the occupational safety of firefighters and the community. For ease, body mass index has often been used to assess these changes. However, it is limited in its accuracy. The purposes of this study were twofold: (a) to compare the validity of different measures of body composition against dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in urban firefighters and (b) to assess these measures in their ability to provide meaningful interpretation of criteria-driven categories of adiposity. A total of 64 male firefighters (age = 44.0 ± 9.5 years) underwent full anthropometric profiling (predictor equations used to determine body fat percentage [BF%]), bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), and DXA assessments. Participants' body mass index was calculated, and BF% and lean mass were determined along with criteria-driven categorizations of adiposity. Anthropometric (skinfolds) predictor equations (e.g., mean bias = −4.4% for BF%) were typically closer to DXA measures, compared with BIA (9.4% for BF%). However, when determining categories of criteria-driven adiposity, BIA (42.9% overweight or obese) provided closer estimates to the DXA-determined distribution (44.6%) than anthropometric-based measures (up to 40%). Body mass index appears an inappropriate measure for accurately determining categories of adiposity with 64.1% classified as overweight or obese. Given the logistical constraints of anthropometric profiling, and the closeness of BIA to DXA in adiposity categories, BIA may be a suitable alternative to DXA for assessing body composition in professional urban firefighters.

AB - Given the importance of body composition in maintaining optimal physical and functional capacities, the use of appropriate, field-based assessment tools should be a priority to assist in maintaining the occupational safety of firefighters and the community. For ease, body mass index has often been used to assess these changes. However, it is limited in its accuracy. The purposes of this study were twofold: (a) to compare the validity of different measures of body composition against dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in urban firefighters and (b) to assess these measures in their ability to provide meaningful interpretation of criteria-driven categories of adiposity. A total of 64 male firefighters (age = 44.0 ± 9.5 years) underwent full anthropometric profiling (predictor equations used to determine body fat percentage [BF%]), bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), and DXA assessments. Participants' body mass index was calculated, and BF% and lean mass were determined along with criteria-driven categorizations of adiposity. Anthropometric (skinfolds) predictor equations (e.g., mean bias = −4.4% for BF%) were typically closer to DXA measures, compared with BIA (9.4% for BF%). However, when determining categories of criteria-driven adiposity, BIA (42.9% overweight or obese) provided closer estimates to the DXA-determined distribution (44.6%) than anthropometric-based measures (up to 40%). Body mass index appears an inappropriate measure for accurately determining categories of adiposity with 64.1% classified as overweight or obese. Given the logistical constraints of anthropometric profiling, and the closeness of BIA to DXA in adiposity categories, BIA may be a suitable alternative to DXA for assessing body composition in professional urban firefighters.

KW - Anthropometry

KW - Body Fat

KW - body mass index

KW - dual energy X-ray absorptiometry

KW - emergency services

KW - Body mass index

KW - Body fat

KW - Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry

KW - Emergency services

KW - Body Composition

KW - Body Mass Index

KW - Firefighters

KW - Humans

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Male

KW - Electric Impedance

KW - Absorptiometry, Photon

KW - Adiposity

KW - Anthropometry/methods

KW - Adult

KW - Skinfold Thickness

KW - anthropometry

KW - dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry

KW - body fat

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85065595504&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.mendeley.com/research/comparison-body-composition-assessment-methods-professional-urban-firefighters

U2 - 10.1123/ijsnem.2018-0040

DO - 10.1123/ijsnem.2018-0040

M3 - Article

VL - 29

SP - 282

EP - 288

JO - International Journal of Sport Nutrition

JF - International Journal of Sport Nutrition

SN - 1526-484X

IS - 3

ER -